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Anonymous:
What part of speech is "running" is this sentence?

I went running.

My understanding is that gerunds are present participles used as nouns. I have also been taught that adverbs tell how, when, where, why, to what extent, how often, how much and under what condition. So is this a gerund functioning as an adverb?

Thank you so much for your help.

Mamaverde
How is this for an analysis?
I like [chocolate]. - Chocolate is a noun

I like [cooking] - Cooking is a noun (gerund)
Thus, I went [running] or [shopping] are gerunds.

However, I saw him washing his car this morning. -Washing is a present particple describing what he was doing when you saw him. In this case, it functions adverbially.
Senior Member4,167
AnonymousI went running. ... So is this a gerund functioning as an adverb?
go (went) is intransitive, so you can't have an noun object, so it can't be a gerund. It might be considered an adverbial participle.

On the other hand, if your interpretation is I went to do (the activity of) running / jogging / etc., you have a case for a gerund.

CJ
Veteran Member53,431
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Anonymous:
Thanks for your feedback.
dimsumexpressI saw him washing his car this morning. -Washing is a present particple describing what he was doing when you saw him. In this case, it functions adverbially.

'Washing' is a verb here, because that's how it's functioning. Just because a word is participial in form says nothing about what its syntactic function is.

In the sentence 'I saw him washing his car this morning', the sequence 'him washing his car this morning' is a subordinate clause functioning as the object of the transitive verb 'saw':

I (sub) saw (verb) [him washing his car this morning]. (object clause)

The subordinate object clause is analysed:

Him (sub) - washing (verb) -his car (obj) -this morning (adverbial)

BillJ
Contributing Member1,474
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Dim, I've been reading some of your posts over the last few weeks and have noticed you're often misleading people. Your knowledge on the subject is impressive for a non-native, but I do think you should let the more experienced answer these questions first. Or if you do wish to continue answering first, perhaps you should mention that it is just your opinion and you are not entirely sure about your answer. No one wants to be misled, so it is just lucky that we have experts, such as CJ and BillJ, who came across this question and cleared this up. I mean not to offend. I just think the forum will be of better use to everybody this way. Of course, you don't have to listen to me. Emotion: smile
Senior Member2,871
Hi BillJ,

If my analytical is wrong, then, I may have to ask my old teacher to review his notes.Emotion: smile Still, this is my approach:
I (subj) saw (verb) him(object) washing his car (noun phrase) this morning( time adverbial)

Thus, I saw him = a complete sentence. [<-Washing his car is morning->] = a noun phrase which (to me) functioned as an non-finite clause (or adverbial).

If this approach is disagreed, I like to get a second opinion from the an American expert. Thanks for the comment.
Subject, object, and adjunct are related to function. On the other hand, NP is a formal quality of words. We should not confuse the two distinct notions.

-----------------
I saw him washing his car this morning.

him = OD
(while he was) washing his car this morning = reduced adverbial clause; an optional predicate adjunct (SVO and not SVOA)

I saw him (while he was) washing his car this morning. = SVO

------------------

I saw him washing his car.
(While I was) Washing his car, I saw him.

washing his car = sentence adjunct

--------------
I saw his (not him) washing his car. = MC (matrix clause)
his washing his car = SC (sub) = OD
Senior Member2,552
InchoateknowledgeI saw him washing his car.
(While I was) Washing his car, I saw him.

washing his car = sentence adjunct

--
I saw his (not him) washing his car. = MC (matrix clause)

his washing his car = SC (sub) = OD

I saw his (not him) washing his car. = MC (matrix clause)
Are you poistive?

I am sorry, I couldn't follow....[:^)]
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