Get some stones, dorktoasts.

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Qp10qp:
What does the expression "Get some stones, dorktoasts" mean in the context of the following comments on the "Rate My Professor" website? (I like it and wonder if it will be useful for bandying about over the meal table.)

"Very particular about usage. Excellent at explaining concepts. Very neurotic and tends to chew tobacco and spit in a cup while lecturing. If you are a female, do NOT fall under his spell . . ..he's a heartbreaker."

"I took this class because of Prof.(David Foster) Wallace's reputation as an author. What a mistake! This guy just likes to hear himself talk, and he won't shut up. He knows how to play the part of a enigmatic "genius" all right, but most of my classmates were (tails off)."
"Yeah, it really sucks having the best writer of his generation teaching us writing. And yeah, it sucks having him talk all class. Why can't he just be quiet so we can sleep. i.e.: he's a super, idiosyncratic prof. A great opportunity for exposure to a fascinating mind. Get some stones, dorktoasts."

Peasemarch.
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Martin Ambuhl:
[nq:1]What does the expression "Get some stones, dorktoasts" mean in the context of the following comments on the "Rate My Professor" website?[/nq]
It is similar to an ad run for Gay Republicans in the last election:

"Be a Republican. Be a man. Get your balls out of your purse."
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Jess Askin:
[nq:1]What does the expression "Get some stones, dorktoasts" mean in the contextof the following comments on the "Rate My Professor" ... can sleep. i.e.: he's a super, idiosyncratic prof. A great opportunity for exposure to a fascinating mind. Get some stones,dorktoasts."[/nq]
Here's (part of) a sentence from Wallace's "Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way":As mentioned before and if this were a piece of metafiction, which it's NOT, the exact number of typeset lines between this reference and the prenominate referent would very probably be mentioned, which would be a princely pain in the ass, not to mention cocky, since it would assume that a straightforward and anti-embellished account of a slow and hot and sleep-deprived and basically clotted and frustrating day in the lives of three kids, none of whom are all that sympathetic, could actually get published, which these days good luck, but in metafiction it would, nay needs be mentioned, a required postmodern convention aimed at drawing the poor old reader's emotional attention to the fact that the narrative bought and paid for and now under time-consuming scrutiny is not in fact a barely-there window onto a different and truly diverting world, but rather in fact an "artifact," an object, a plain old this-wordly thing, composed of emulsified wood pulp and horizontal chorus-lines of dye, and conventions , and is thus in a "deep" sense just an opaque forgery of a transfiguring window, not a real window, a gag, and thus in a deep (but intentional , no) sense artificial, which is to say fabricated, false, a fiction, a pretender-to-status, a straw-haired King of Spain this self-conscious explicitness and deconstructed disclosure supposedly making said metafiction "realer" than a piece of pre-postmodern "Realism" that depends on certain antiquated techniques to create an "illusion" of a windowed access to a "reality" isomorphic with ours but possessed of and yielding up higher truths to which all authentically human persons stand in the relation of applicand all of which the Resurrection of Realism, the pained product of inglorious minimalist labor in countless obscure graduate writing workshops across the U.S.

of A., and called by Field Marchal Lish (who ought to know) the New Realism, promises to show to be utter baloney, this metafictional ***...
His own later comment on this work was "The stuff's a permanent migraine."
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Anonymous:
[nq:1]What does the expression "Get some stones, dorktoasts" mean in thecontext of the following comments on the "Rate My Professor" ... we can sleep. i.e.: he's a super, idiosyncratic prof. Agreat opportunity for exposure to a fascinating mind. Get some stones,dorktoasts."[/nq]
"Become manlier, contemptible persons."
I've never heard "dorktoast" before. Maybe for some students at this college, "toast" is an all-purpose suffix, or an all-purpose suffix to insults the way "wad" was in my day. I'm just speculating.

If you bandy "tosser" about the meal table, I think "dorktoast" will suit you fine.

Jerry Friedman
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Jess Askin:
[nq:2]What does the expression "Get some stones, dorktoasts" mean in thecontext of the following comments on the "Rate My Professor" website?[/nq]
[nq:1]It is similar to an ad run for Gay Republicans in the last election: "Be a Republican. Be a man. Get your balls out of your purse."[/nq]
Does that come from an actual ad or just a documentary on Trio?
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Qp10qp:
[nq:2]What does the expression "Get some stones, dorktoasts" mean?[/nq]
[nq:1]"Become manlier, contemptible persons."[/nq]
Thanks to you and others for this explanation. I had no idea that "stones" were balls (I don't think we have that expression on this side of the drink, though perhaps I'm sheltered). Not really appropriate for the meal table, I fear.
[nq:1]I've never heard "dorktoast" before. Maybe for some students at this college, "toast" is an all-purpose suffix, or an all-purpose suffix to insults the way "wad" was in my day.[/nq]
Given the evident meaning, I wonder if it derives from "milquetoast"?

Peasemarch.
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Martin Ambuhl:
[nq:1]context of[/nq]
[nq:2]It is similar to an ad run for Gay Republicans ... Be a man. Get your balls out of your purse."[/nq]
[nq:1]Does that come from an actual ad or just a documentary on Trio?[/nq]
I have no idea what "Trio" is. Maurice Bonamigo produced an ad to encourage gay Republicans to split from the national Log Cabin Republicans, who were not supporting Bush. Included in the ad are these words, spoken br Bonamigo:
“I get very offended by this organization when they’re saying, ‘well I’m not going to support Bush, I’m not giving any more money, he betrayed us’. Oh, for crying out loud! Get over yourselves. Be a Republican. Be a man. Get your balls out of your purse and start wearing them like a man”.
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Mike Lyle:
[nq:1]Thanks to you and others for this explanation. I had no idea that "stones" were balls (I don't think we have that expression on this side of the drink, though perhaps I'm sheltered). [/nq]
And of what, then, O sheltered one, do you imagine "goolies" to be a translation? (This is an oops: see below.) "Stones" are ordinary in the usage of both peasants and those concerned with horses. I myself am not entirely innocent of the expression "get one's rocks off".

Curiously, "goolie" also just means simply "pebble" in Aus...looks in dictionary...good Heavens! I was wrong after all. Being Strine, I thought that was what it meant in Hindi; but it turns out to mean "ball or bullet" in that language. Scrub my earlier question, please.

Is this the moment, do you think, to remind our readers about gruesome "goolie chits"?
Mike.
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Donna Richoux:
[nq:2]"Become manlier, contemptible persons."[/nq]
[nq:1]Thanks to you and others for this explanation. I had no idea that "stones" were balls (I don't think we have that expression on this side of the drink, though perhaps I'm sheltered). Not really appropriate for the meal table, I fear.[/nq]
I don't think they are. I think it's from the well-known:

He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.
The (dorktoast) people were criticizing the professor, and the writer of the comment is saying, don't criticize unless you're as accomplished.

Yes, I will acknowledge that Cassell's includes "testicle(s); courage" among various other slang meanings of "stone." But I don't think that is applicable here. Telling people to get some courage when you are actually jumping on them for being unduly negative is not even sensible. Telling them to get balls would mean to speak up more, not to hush up.
[nq:2]I've never heard "dorktoast" before. Maybe for some students at ... suffix to insults the way "wad" was in my day.[/nq]
"Toast" has been a popular silly word for the last ten years or so. I don't know if it ever had any particular meaning besides the one of "finished, history"; mostly, it just sounds innocent and amusing in all combinations. Are there any darker shades of "toast" that anyone is aware of?
[nq:1]Given the evident meaning, I wonder if it derives from "milquetoast"?[/nq]
I think that one is too long forgotten. I vaguely assume it comes from the uselessness of a piece of burned toast.

Best Donna Richoux
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