glad/happy?

11 replies
1 2
Anonymous:
Hi,

"I'm glad that you came to see me."

Is 'happy' also fine to use instead of 'glad' here? E.g.

"I'm happy that you came to see me."

Do the two words have the same meaning here?

Thanks in advance
I have to laugh at this one.

My example that I use, when people can't resist the urge to change someone's writing, is the change "happy" to "glad." It makes no difference at all, but they feel like they "contributed" something to the piece.

There's no difference at all.
Veteran Member27,495
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Grammar Geek ... is the change "happy" to "glad."
GG: You would have communicated the thought so much more effectively if you had only written ...is the change from "glad" to "happy" .... Emotion: big smile
CJ
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Wow. I thought glad was lesser in intensity than happy, just as hungry is than starving. No difference at all?
Veteran Member7,658
Actually, I sense that glad is greater in intensity than happy, but not by much.
CJ
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Thanks, CalifJim. That helps me tune my emotions to that of the natives Emotion: smile

By the way, Are there any mistakes in the sentence above?
Just a little one. ... to those of the natives. Emotion: smile
CJ
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Anonymous:
Grammar Geek
I have to laugh at this one.

My example that I use, when people can't resist the urge to change someone's writing, is the change "happy" to "glad." It makes no difference at all, but they feel like they "contributed" something to the piece.

There's no difference at all.

Hi GG,
Thank you very much.
Could you explain what "they "contributed" something to the piece" mean? My English is too poor to understnat that.

Do you mean 'I'm happy that you came to see me' sounds natural?
They are then able to say that they "helped" with the final version, even though their "help" was to make a meaningless change.

Yes, it's very natural.
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