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Anonymous:
Hi!
Can I start witing a formal letter with "Dear Mr. or Mrs."? Without any names, just the phrase in the quotation marks.
Can I start writing an informal letter to my aunt and my uncle with "Dear uncle, dear aunt" or maybe "Dear uncle and aunt"?
I you consider these greetings incorrect, can you suggest something instead?
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Hi,

Can I start writing a formal letter with "Dear Mr. or Mrs."? Without any names, just the phrase in the quotation marks. No.


Can I start writing an informal letter to my aunt and my uncle with "Dear uncle, dear aunt" or maybe "Dear uncle and aunt"? Yes. It's more common to use 'and'.

We often refer to such relatives by name, so you could say 'Dear Aunt Mary and Uncle Tom,'. It's considered polite to put the woman's name first. I've also capitalized 'aunt' and 'uncle'.

Best wishes, Clive

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In business letters (or formal letters, and in any kind of letter, really), we should make it a point to know who we are addressing. Of course you can use "Dear Mr. or Mrs.:," but your readers may lose interest. Why will they lose interest? Because you don't take the time to acknowledge who they are. How do they know that the letter in question is addressed to them?

Take some time to complete your salutation by using correct names and titles.

For informal letters to your uncle and aunt, yes, just couple their names and titles together with "and."
Full Member179
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Of course you can use "Dear Mr. or Mrs.:,"

I really have to disagree. "Dear Mr. or Mrs." just looks really unprofessional. You can't use it in a business letter. (And if the person reading it is an unmarried female, she's not even addressed at all!)
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Anonymous:
Hey!

I would advise you to start your letter with: Dear Mr.(last name) or Dear Mrs.(last name),

I would advise you to say: Dear Uncle and Aunt,

Hope that helps!
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If you have no way of knowing the name, and it's not important enough to find out, you can say "Dear Sir or Madam." This is not as good as using the actual names, but it's better than "Dear Mr. or Mrs."
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Anonymous:
no they are not incorrect if youre writing to your aunt or uncle does it really matter they know you and you know them o the other han if it is a busines letter you should probably start off with "dear Sir/Madam
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Anonymous:
I'm looking at all these responses and has everyone forgotten our friend in ambiguity "To Whom It May Concern"?
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Hi,

I'm looking at all these responses and has everyone forgotten our friend in ambiguity "To Whom It May Concern"?

Other than for a general letter of reference for someone, are you seriously suggesting that people should write business letters starting with 'To Whom It May Concern'?

Please, please, please say you aren't advocating this.

Best wishes, Clive
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