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Anonymous:
Hi all,

I don't know whether this kind of questions have ever been asked before, but I couldn't find it anywhere.

So, Here's my questions.

1) I have been to Paris.-- correct

2) I have gone to Paris. -- incorrect.

I know that the first sentence is correct while the second is not.

Then What about the following two sentences?

3) How long have you been to Australia?

4) How long have you gone to Australia?

Is Sentence 4) correct? I usually use sentence 3) but not quite sure about sentence 4).

One more... Is sentence 6) wrong? I kinda saw this sentence sometimes on the web.

5) Have you ever been to a convert?

6) Have you ever gone to a concert?

Thank you for your time.
Number 2 is correct if the person is still in Paris. Number 4 would be correct if you add "for" and the person was still in Australia at the time of asking..

How long have you gone to Australia for?

For how long have you gone to Australia?

For me, 6 is incorrect.
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Emotion: thinking I would prefer 3. with "in": "How long have you been in Australia?"... But maybe both versions are correct?
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PieanneEmotion: thinking I would prefer 3. with "in": "How long have you been in Australia?"... But maybe both versions are correct?

Nope, 4, as it stands, is incorrect.
I did mean in 3., not 4.
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I don't find #6 objectionable in the right context:

6a. Have you ever been to a concert where the pianist dropped dead during the encore? Well, I have.

6b. Have you ever gone to a concert and found yourself wishing you could leave after the first five minutes? Well, I have.

6a seems to present the death of the pianist in relation to the speaker's "now"; 6b seems to present the desire to leave in relation to the "going to the concert".

MrP
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PieanneI did mean in 3., not 4.

3 is incorrect as it stands.
Hi,

A small further note. In very, very general terms, 'to have been to' just states that 'I was present in the place', whereas 'to go to' expresses some sense of purposeful movement. eg

If my plane made an unplanned stop in London, I might later say 'I have been to London', but I probably wouldn't say 'I went to London'.

Best wishes, Clive
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MilkyNumber 2 is correct if the person is still in Paris.
I will be puzzled if I hear someone say "I have gone to Paris" when the speaker is still in Paris.

paco
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