How do we call cousin's son or daughter?

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Steve:
how do we call cousin's son or daughter? If they call me, do they call me uncle?
please advice. thx.
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Ray O'Hara:
[nq:1]how do we call cousin's son or daughter? If they call me, do they call me uncle? please advice. thx.[/nq]
They are your cousins, once removed from whatever cousin they are. If their parent is your first cousin they are your first cousin once removed.
They don't call you uncle because you aren't their uncle. The usual term for addressing a cousin is to use one's given name. If you are unhappy with them calling you Steve then I suggest you get over yourself.
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Pat Durkin:
[nq:1]how do we call cousin's son or daughter? If they call me, do they call me uncle? please advice. thx.[/nq]
To you, they are "once removed (by generations)".
My first cousin is the child of a sibling of one of my parents. He is in my generation.
A child of that first cousin is also a cousin to me, removed by one generation.
Recently, in alt.usage.english, there was a thread in which some web pages were provided that demonstrated many degrees of kindred. Search for "alt.usage.english"+cousin
Here is a message found on a search through Google groups (alt.usage.english:
groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/msg/3e56428b1c878274

The Google Groups alt.usage.english thread is "Great Second Cousins? with more than 145 comments, and some good references to websites with charts, in addition to the charts presented in the threads.
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mm:
[nq:1]how do we call cousin's son or daughter? If they call me, do they call me uncle?[/nq]
By definition, they are your cousins once removed, and you are theirs.

But definition is not a lock and chains.
They call you whatever their parents tell them to call you that you don't object to.
Or, they call you whatever you ask them to call you if they or their parents don't object.
When I was little, like 8, my mother or my mother's best friend wanted me to call her Aunt Hilda, but I refused because she wasn't my aunt. I had to grow up quite a bit to realize that calling her aunt wouldn't have confused anyone, and I was being a stubborn literalist. I'm still a stubborn literalist, but I don't think I've been so where there was no good reason anymore.
Thank goodness the woman had two children of her own, and probably nieces and nephews, or I think my refusal would have really hurt her. But it was MY decision. This is not something you can force on your cousin's child, and you don't seem to want to.
It turned out that at least one demographic study in NY in the 60's greatly overreported the size of Puerto Rican and other Latin families. Because iirc, it is their practice to refer to niblings as their sons or daughters, especially if they spend a lot of time in the house, or maybe if they are there when they are discussed. They also call friends their cousins even when there is no blood relationship. These are gestures of closeness and affection.
In addition, while there are Spanish words for step-father and step-mother, at least in Mexico and Central America, and probably all of Latin America using them even where they apply is pretty much an insult. It's a denial of the closeness that a normal family is striving for.
[nq:1]please advice. thx.[/nq]
If you are inclined to email me
for some reason, remove NOPSAM :-)
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John Varela:
[nq:1]To you, they are "once removed (by generations)". My first cousin is the child of a sibling of one of my parents. He is in my generation. A child of that first cousin is also a cousin to me, removed by one generation.[/nq]
That was the rule as I learned it: the degree of cousinhood is measured in your own generation, with generational offsets counted as "removals". But there's a problem with that:
Your cousin's child is your first cousin once removed. Your child and your first cousin's child are second cousins. So, taking it from the point of view of your cousin's child, you are his second cousin once removed. Which is to say that the relationship is asymetric: he is your first cousin once removed, but you are his second cousin once removed.
[nq:1]Recently, in alt.usage.english, there was a thread in which some web pages were provided that demonstrated many degrees of kindred. Search for "alt.usage.english"+cousin[/nq]
Those charts didn't have the asymmetry, but the rule they use is more complicated than the above and I am unable to state it.

John Varela
Trade NEW lamps for OLD for email.
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Tim B:
[nq:1]how do we call cousin's son or daughter?[/nq]
With a telephone or by shouting. You mean 'What do we call cousin's son or daughter? ', not 'how do we call cousin's son or daughter?'
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Bill McCray:
[nq:2]To you, they are "once removed (by generations)". My first ... is also a cousin to me, removed by one generation.[/nq]
[nq:1]That was the rule as I learned it: the degree of cousinhood is measured in your own generation, with generational ... that the relationship is asymetric: he is your first cousin once removed, but you are his second cousin once removed.[/nq]
Starting from the generation of the sibling ancestors, count the generations to the two people whose relationship you are trying to determine. Call one of those counts I; the other J.

Min(I,J) gives the cousin level and Max(I,J) - Min(I,J) gives the removal.
For example, if the counts are 3 and 5, they are third cousins twice removed.
Bill
Reverse parts of the user name and ISP name for my e-address
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Odysseus:
[nq:1]Your cousin's child is your first cousin once removed. Your child and your first cousin's child are second cousins. So, ... that the relationship is asymetric: he is your first cousin once removed, but you are his second cousin once removed.[/nq]
Not AIUI. I agree that my child and my first cousin's child would be second cousins (if I had relatives in those categories). But I disagree that I would be a second cousin to my first cousin's child. Although our common ancestors would be his or her great-grandparents, the ordinal is determined by the closer relationship to these ancestors, here mine to my grandparents.
One ought to be able to say, e.g. "We are first cousins once removed," without having to specify from which point of view the statement is true.

Odysseus
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Pavel314:
Here's a relationship chart:
http://www.cousincouples.com/info/relation.shtml
Paul
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