How to use i.e. /e.g./ for example /and so on?

This question has been answered · 42 replies
1 2 3 4 5
Anonymous:
I buy many things in this shop i.e. /e.g. game player, toyes, flowers and so on.

Is this sentence right?

can i use "and so on" after "e.g. or i.e."?

Can i use "for example," instead of "i.e" or "e.g."?

CAn you give me some example of using these word? Thank^^
Approved answer (verified by )
Use "e.g." to give an example (or several examples). It means "for example".

Use "i.e." to give a fuller explanation of something already stated. It means "that is". You don't use "for example" in place of "i.e.".

Specific to your question:
I bought a lot of things in that shop, for example, games, toys, and flowers.
I bought a lot of things in that shop, e.g., games, toys, and flowers.

Don't use "and so on" directly after either of these. You wouldn't say "for example, and so on", so you wouldn't write "e.g., and so on" either! The same goes for "that is, and so on".

CJ
Veteran Member53,475
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
ALL REPLIES
Anonymous
I buy many things in this shop i.e. /e.g. game player, toyes, flowers and so on.

Is this sentence right?

can i use "and so on" after "e.g. or i.e."?

Can i use "for example," instead of "i.e" or "e.g."?

CAn you give me some example of using these word? Thank^^

i.e. ( id est-- latin ) means "that is" or "in other words." It specifies or makes more clear. I'm going to the place where I work i.e. the university.

e.g. means for example ( exempli gratia-- latin ) We have a lot of activities planned for the BBQ e.g. baseball, basketball, karaoke, and so on.

Full Member154
i.e. is short for Latin "id est" (that is)/ e.g. is short for Latin "exempli gratia" (for example); the former tends to be used for explaining things , the latter just for giving examples. I don't see any problem in adding "and so on" after a list of things. You can also use "among others" (in the case of giving examples), then you won't need to add "and so on".
Veteran Member7,461
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.Trusted Users: Trusted users are allowed to use additional capabilities of the site such as private messaging to all users and various other advanced features. You cannot join this role unless you are promoted by an administrator.
CalifJimUse "e.g." to give an example (or several examples). It means "for example".

Use "i.e." to give a fuller explanation of something already stated. It means "that is". You don't use "for example" in place of "i.e.".

Specific to your question:
I bought a lot of things in that shop, for example, games, toys, and flowers.
I bought a lot of things in that shop, e.g., games, toys, and flowers.

Don't use "and so on" directly after either of these. You wouldn't say "for example, and so on", so you wouldn't write "e.g., and so on" either! The same goes for "that is, and so on".

CJ

I think the use of punctuation is interesting. Personally, I don't use full stops, which I realise is down to style. However, the use of commas is interesting. I notice, CJ, that you use two commas. I use one.

I bought a lot of things, eg toothpaste, toys, etc.
Full Member144
That's just how it was drilled into me as a child, I suppose!
Perhaps now, centuries later, preferences have changed.
Being American, I don't use full stops either; I use periods!
I must confess that in general my punctuation is very seat-of-the-pants.
I avoid answering any posts on punctuation because of this. Emotion: smile
CJ
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
CalifJimI avoid answering any posts on punctuation because of this. Emotion: smile
CJ

You just did Emotion: big smile

What does 'seat-of-the-pants' mean, CJ?

I used to use periods/full stops too. I just changed as modern English doesn't seem to require them. In fact, I think modern English has far less punctuation altogether. I'll go along with that. Why make life more complicated Emotion: big smile

Btw, how about responding to my subjunctive thread and the old phrasal verb thread. I value your opinion Emotion: smile

Anyone who's a fan of Nietzche!

Man is a beast stretched between eternal oblivion and superman... or something like that Emotion: smile
I avoid answering ...
You just did
Avoid or answer? Emotion: smile

I tried responding to the phrasal verb thread and got into some technical difficulties. For some reason, it wouldn't let me post. And then I just forgot about it and never tried again as I got involved in some other threads.

Anyway, I'm still cogitating on phrasal verbs. You know how you start off thinking one thing and by the time you explain why you think that way you end up wondering if you truly do believe it. I'm sort of in that never-never land on phrasal verbs right now, so I prefer to think it over a little more before saying anything even more confusing than I've already said.

As for the subjunctive thread, it seemed to be asking for terminology. I'm not as well-read as I should be on that sort of thing, my attitude being "Call it a monkey if you want"! It's clear that there is an "if only ... would" construction, and an "I wish ..." construction, and an "if I were ..." construction, and I've never found it amusing to speculate on what the best descriptive word (subjunctive, or whatever) might be for each case. My personal preference is to avoid the word "subjunctive" where the word "would" is concerned. I just don't see "would" as a marker of the subjunctive. Other than that I don't have any strong opinions on it (today, anyway!).

CJ
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
CalifJim
I avoid answering ...
You just did
Avoid or answer? Emotion: smile

I tried responding to the phrasal verb thread and got into some technical difficulties. For some reason, it wouldn't let me post. And then I just forgot about it and never tried again as I got involved in some other threads.

Anyway, I'm still cogitating on phrasal verbs. You know how you start off thinking one thing and by the time you explain why you think that way you end up wondering if you truly do believe it. I'm sort of in that never-never land on phrasal verbs right now, so I prefer to think it over a little more before saying anything even more confusing than I've already said.

As for the subjunctive thread, it seemed to be asking for terminology. I'm not as well-read as I should be on that sort of thing, my attitude being "Call it a monkey if you want"! It's clear that there is an "if only ... would" construction, and an "I wish ..." construction, and an "if I were ..." construction, and I've never found it amusing to speculate on what the best descriptive word (subjunctive, or whatever) might be for each case. My personal preference is to avoid the word "subjunctive" where the word "would" is concerned. I just don't see "would" as a marker of the subjunctive. Other than that I don't have any strong opinions on it (today, anyway!).

CJ

Hi CJ

I was reading an archived post on the subject of the subjunctive (I think by a user called Maria or Mara) and you were on that thread too. She was talking about a similar issue and I just simply disagreed with her. She said that when we use the past simple to refer to a wish or non-fact that it was the 'unmarked subjunctive'. How on earth can it be unmarked if we use the past tense to identify it!

Sometimes I feel I'm going out of my mind looking for answers to my questions. I feel I need to know the answers because I'm new to teaching and I feel I have to make damn sure that I know my target language. If a student points to some construction and asks me if it's the subjunctive or not, I can't reply, 'No, it's a monkey!' Emotion: big smile

I know what you mean when you say you begin to answer something and then you realise that your answer is leading you to inconsistencies in your own understanding. I'm sure that's a good thing, in some ways, albeit frustrating. Sometimes, when people don't reply to my questions I feel that, either I've asked a really stupid question or a really difficult one. I get paranoid and I don't understand why some people are here.

Some have thousands of posts and I would have thought that meant that they have dealt with every possible grammar question. Because I'm new to teaching, I'm under the assumption that every teacher here knows more about English grammar than I do, and that's why it's really frustrating for me. I feel that, if someone knows the answer to my questions then why don't they just tell me!

If anyone thinks that I should find out the answers for myself, they don't know how wrong they are. Everything I have learnt has been self-taught. I learned everything the hard way and from scratch. If I have a question, you can be sure it derived from some painful research that didn't reveal the answer.

Anyway, thanks for your responses so far, CJ

Jussive
Show more
Live chat
Registered users can join here