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I do not know how to use the usual pronunciation key thingys, so I'll try to get my thought across phonetically
Shone, as in The moon shone on the water.
Is it properly pronounced:
Sh-own
OR
Sh-awn?

And

Jaguar
Jagwar
OR
Jag-u-ar?

Thanks
ERic
New Member07
Shone = sh-on.

Jaguar. In British English it is Jag-u-ar but I believe that in American English it is Jagwar
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Hi,
Jaguar. In British English it is Jag-u-ar but I believe that in American English it is Jagwar
Don't forget that there is a /j/-sound in there! /Jagwar/ is the most commonly heard pronunciation in the US, although the 'British' one is also used by some GAE speakers. A GAE speaker would always pronounce the 'r', though.

Englishuser
Regular Member717
I thank you both very much, as a child my parents told me Jaguar was pronounced as Jagwar. This caused me some concern because in the area I was raised the people would often refer to those metal things that carry electricy as war. Like "Cut the red war, not the blue war." And I was told to NEVER pronounce it that way. So when it came to jaguar it was a real internal struggle and I pronounced it jagwire for a while.

Thanks all
Eric
Anonymous:
EnglishuserHi,
Jaguar. In British English it is Jag-u-ar but I believe that in American English it is Jagwar
Don't forget that there is a /j/-sound in there! /Jagwar/ is the most commonly heard pronunciation in the US, although the 'British' one is also used by some GAE speakers. A GAE speaker would always pronounce the 'r', though.

Englishuser
Using / /'s imply that you're using phonemic IPA or XSAMPA transcription. If this is the case then that means that you pronounce "jaguar" as /jagwar/, which written in fauxnetics would be approximately "yahgwahr". Somehow I don't think you meant it that way. In IPA/XSAMPA, the letter "j" is pronounced like "y" in English. I myself, pronounce jagwar as [dZegwaI@r\], or in fauxnetics: jay-gwire. In my particular dialect, / { / ("a" as in "hat") is realised as [ e ] ("a" as in hate) before [ g ]. In other North American dialects that do not possess the bag-beg-vague vowel merger, it would be pronounced as either [dZ{gwaI@r\] (same as above, but with the vowel in "hat" rather than "hate") or [dZ{gwar\] (jaehgwahr). >> Jag-u-ar << Should I assume this is [dZ{guar\]? --Marvin A.
Using / /'s imply that you're using phonemic IPA or XSAMPA transcription. If this is the case then that means that you pronounce "jaguar" as /jagwar/, which written in fauxnetics would be approximately "yahgwahr". Somehow I don't think you meant it that way. In IPA/XSAMPA, the letter "j" is pronounced like "y" in English. I myself, pronounce jagwar as [dZegwaI@r\], or in fauxnetics: jay-gwire. In my particular dialect, /{/ ("a" as in "hat") is realised as [ e ] ("a" as in hate) before [ g ]. In other North American dialects that do not possess the bag-beg-vague vowel merger, it would be pronounced as either [dZ{gwaI@r\] (same as above, but with the vowel in "hat" rather than "hate") or [dZ{gwar\] (jaehgwahr).

>> Jag-u-ar <<

Should I assume this is [dZ{guar\]?
Regular Member638
>> Jag-u-ar <<

Should I assume this is [dZ{guar\]?
I think the poster was indicating 'jag-yoo-ar. I'm guessing that's what you write as ['dZ{g ju ar\]

CJ
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>> I think the poster was indicating 'jag-yoo-ar. I'm guessing that's what you write as ['dZ{g ju ar\]

CJ <<

Ah ok. Wow, this word sure has a lot of variation!
It's always /ˈdʒægjʊə/ in 'Standard British' RP English pronunciation*.

In the US it seems that /ˈdʒægwɑːr/ or /ˈdʒægjʊɑːr/ as one of the posters mentioned are the norm.

Remember US English prefers the rhotic 'r' as does Scottish English and therefore Scottish pronunciation would be another variant as in /ˈdʒægjʊər/

*As Scotland is part of Britain, the term 'Standard British' only refers to England and Wales and as such the term 'British' English is somewhat misleading!

Hope that helps...
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