"I am screwed."?

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Hi teachers,

What's the meaning of " I am screwed"?

Thanks in advance!
Junior Member77
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It's casual, as you might suspect.

I'd say, "I'm thwarted."
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If your friend borrowed your car and got into a hit and run accident with out telling you. When the cop shows up at your door steps to look for the owner. "you are screwed" by your friend.

If someone did something bad to cause you problem as a result, you can use that expression.
Senior Member3,816
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This thread is getting a little crazy.

Goodman, the phrase "I am screwed" is a common one. It doesn't require deliberate action on the part of another to cause the problem. Life can screw you. Traffic can screw you. Your competing priorities can screw you. In those situatons, you don't say "LIfe has screwed me." You just say "Oh, man, am I ever screwed!"

There's no sexual connotation AT ALL (although as Clive pointed out, it origin of the word is sexual so you need to be careful who you use this around.)

Did you read my example about the fellow who was sure to be late when his wife told him not to be late that night? He was screwed.

If your boss says "I need you to work late tonight, or I'll know you're not serious about this job and the promotion will go to John" and your girlfriend says "We're having dinner with my parents and if you don't show up, I'll know you're not serious about our relationship, and it's over" you're screwed.

If you get to the airport and realize you left your wallet with your ID at home, and you don't have time to drive home and back before your fligth, you're screwed.

If you need a synonym, I guess you say "I have some problems here."
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Can it mean " I am drunk"?
I've never heard it used that way.

When used in the active voice, we often say, "He really screwed me up," to distinguish the "thwarted" use from the sexual use.

But the expression, "I'm screwed up," or "I'm messed up" is sometimes used to mean, "I'm drunk," or "high" on some substance.

In "I'm screwed," "to screw" can be taken as a passive verb (eg, "I have been screwed") or as a participle as adjective, just as in "I'm thwarted." It describes my condition.

In either case, the agent is not stated. It may be a person, or a thing, or a situation. You may be on your way to an interview for the job of a lifetime, knowing that you must be on time. You have a flat tire. "I'm screwed" is completely appropriate. Nobody screwed you.
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Hi Lamjin

No, that expression is not normally used to mean "I am drunk".

However, if you are very drunk, you might end up doing something stupid that gets (or will get) you into trouble. Then you might say "I'm screwed".
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In "I'm screwed," "to screw" can be taken as a passive verb (eg, "I have been screwed") or as a participle as adjective, just as in "I'm thwarted "

Wow! for as long as my life living in the US, I have never "thwarted" associated with " screwed".

Ok, a couple of comments:

But the expression, "I'm screwed up," or "I'm messed up" is sometimes used to mean, "I'm drunk," or "high" on some substance.

"screwed up" has absolutely no literal connection with being drunk. But getting behind the wheel after a few drinks can really screw up your life. Perhaps "buzzed...is the word related to being drunk"

We may say " the engine calibrated is all screwed up after he tweaked with it". But "I am screwed up" is a bit off to me.
Edit:

Wow! for as long as my life living in the US, I have never heard "thwarted" associated with " screwed".
Goodman "screwed up" has absolutely no literal connection with being drunk.
We may say " the engine calibrated is all screwed up after he tweaked with it".
Goodman When the cop shows up at your door steps to look for the owner. "you are screwed" by your friend.
"screwed" has absolutely no literal connection with the relationship between friends.
We may say, "I think my friend has a screw loose in his head." You probably have literal adjusting screws in your carburetor, but it's unlikely your friend has them in his head. Why does everything suddenly have to be literal?
Goodman Wow! for as long as my life living in the US, I have never heard "thwarted" associated with " screwed".
Sorry. I'm a little out of practice. Native speakers are not often asked to furnish a synonym for "screwed." Personally, I think it's perfect. I don't have my thesaurus handy. Perhaps you can offer a proper synonym. Emotion: smile

Best regards, - A.

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