Hi all,

"I dare do all that may become a man"

I searched on the dictionary, and I found the word "become" has two meanings. One is "to be suitable for", and second one is "to start to be", according to the Cambridge online dictionary.

Does it mean this statement has double meaning? the first one is : "I will screw every boy who starts to be a man" and the second one is "I will do everything that is suitable for a man"

Thank you.
New Member31
I really don't see how you got your first sentence!

"Become" has two meanings: be = (1) begin to be; (2) turn into; AND suit = be appropriate to.

The original sentence is using the second meaning = I will do anything that may be appropriate to being a man
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become has a fuirther meaning and it is the one that applies here - to make something attractive. It's usually used in the form 'becoming' and it is a little old-fashioned. Of course, it doesn't have to mean just physically attractive - he wants to do everything that is admirable in a man.

Example

That dress is most becoming on you.

Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary

become (SUIT) Show phonetics
verb [T] became, become OLD-FASHIONED
to cause to look attractive or to be suitable for:
That colour really becomes you.

becoming Show phonetics
adjective OLD-FASHIONED
That's a most becoming (= attractive) dress, my dear.
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Feebs, I'm guessing the first, and rather hilarious, sentence comes from the common use of "do" to mean "have sexual intercourse with." "Man, I'd sure like to do her."

If he's going to "do" all that, or who, may become a man, it means everything except the women and old guys. I guess. Emotion: surprise
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Nah, it includes women who are considering transgender surgery as well!
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<screams of laughter>
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Anonymous:
If you have read Act 1 Scene 7, you may have noticed the rather chiding nature of Lady MacBeth but not only this, the longer monologue prior to her entrance. What Shakespear hints at here is an old theme. He hints there in several ways "But here, upon this bank and shoal of time/We'ld jump the life to come..." The fisherman/king; "Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return/To plague the inventor" Instructions previously taut to him, by whom? "So clear in his great office, that his virtues / Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against / The deep damnation of his taking-off; / And pity, like a naked new-born babe," And it goes on. The female then chides him, despite his willingness to "To prick the sides of my intent". This is the "wounding in the side" scenario, dancing the masculine power of generation, and he is willing, essentially to become a man through wo(o)ing. - a wo man It is a deeply structured description of power, directly from the bloodied lips of Francis Bacon. Here, he truely shakes his spear in our face.
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