Anonymous:
Why is there no 'will' before "feel" in this sentence?

"I hope you (will) feel better soon."

Thanks.
It's possibly because feeling better is not something that is under that person's direct control. Compare the following, where the action is under their control:

"I hope you will consider my offer."

"I hope you will study harder in future."
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Anonymous:
But can I say: "I hope you will feel better soon" or it's wrong?
AnonymousBut can I say: "I hope you will feel better soon" or it's wrong?
It isn't exactly wrong, but it's usually not as natural.
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Anonymous:
Thanks!
Oh, and I forgot to mention ...

Remember that in conversation, "I will", in this context or any other, is almost always contracted to "I'll", except when "will" is being emphasised.
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Anonymous:
OK, thanks a lot!
Mr WordyRemember that in conversation, "I will", in this context or any other, is almost always contracted to "I'll", except when "will" is being emphasised.
Although it's equally true of "I will", I did, of course, mean to say here that "you will" is normally contracted to "you'll".
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