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Anonymous:
Choice A is correct in a sense that it is widely used.
Choice A is correct in the sense that it is widely used.

1. Do both sentences above sound natural?
2. If yes, could you please explain the difference?
I'm afraid only the second sentence sounds acceptable to native ears. Choice A is correct and the criterion for correctness mentioned in the sentence is that it is widely used. It seems to be the only criterion the speaker has in mind when he says the sentence.

In many similar sentences the indefinite article is possible, though:

I saw a film that I'll never forget.

CB
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Hello,

Both are correct to me........but in different concepts.

Thanks.
Full Member265
Anonymous:
CB,
Thank you for your explanation.
In another example below, is the second example with 'the' the only one acceptable to native ears since the speaker has only one idea (way) in mind?

Fold your arms in a way your hands touch your elbows.
Fold your arms in the way your hands touch your elbows.

Toms,
You say both are correct, but would you mind telling me how they are different in concept?
In a sense

in a way; in one way of looking at it. In a sense, cars make life better. But, in a sense, they also make life worse.

In a sense

considering a situation in a particular way It is tragic, in a sense, to see a family business destroyed.

See also: sense

Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006. Reproduced with permission.
Senior Member4,167
Anonymous:
dimsumexpressIn a sense

in a way; in one way of looking at it. In a sense, cars make life better. But, in a sense, they also make life worse.

In a sense

considering a situation in a particular way It is tragic, in a sense, to see a family business destroyed.

See also: sense
IdiA()
Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006. Reproduced with permission.

Thanks, dimsumexpress, for your input, but are you suggesting that only the phrase 'in a sense' is acceptable and never 'in the sense' since it is the only one that can be found in dictionaries?
AnonymousChoice A is correct in a sense that it is widely used.
Choice A is correct in the sense that it is widely used.
Only the second one is correct in this context. In other contexts you can say "in a sense."

The difference is that with "in the sense" you give a specific example such as "it is widely used." You can find many examples of this use with Google. Just enter the phrase in quotes exactly the way it appears in blue in this paragraph.

With "in a sense" you don't give any examples. So, you could say that "Choice A is correct in a sense." or "In a sense Choice A is correct." to indicate that in some circumstances it is, in fact, correct but it's not necessarily always correct.

Here is one dictionary definition: according to one explanation or view; to a certain extent: In a sense it may have been the only possible solution.

Here's another: Sort of, in some ways but not others.
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Anonymous:
Thank you, RayH, for that detailed explanation. This makes perfect sense to me now.
Also, I will try googling the phrase as you suggest. Cheers. Emotion: smile
AnonymousChoice A is correct in a sense that it is widely used.
Choice A is correct in the sense that it is widely used.

1. Do both sentences above sound natural?
2. If yes, could you please explain the difference?

Only the second is correct. The function of the is to indicate that the speaker (writer) knows which specific [person, thing, ...] he's talking about, and that the listener (reader) can figure it out as well.

Things can be correct in a sense. [No specific sense can be inferred from this. There is some unspecified sense in which we can take these things to be correct.]
And things can be correct in the sense that they are widely used. [Which sense is specified.]
And things can be correct in the sense that everybody approves of them. [Which sense is specified.]

So it's either in a sense (with nothing more said) or in the sense that .... Those are the choices.

CJ
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