Hi,

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2009/aug/21/university-places-filling-rapidly

A record number of university applicants and the recession are thought to have made the desperate scramble for places more intense than ever, with 1,813 more students securing places in the first day of clearing yesterday than this time last year.

Can I replace "in the first day" with "on the first day"?

Some 377,658 students have confirmed their places – 31,601 more than last year – after the A-level pass rate climbed to 97.5% and the proportion of papers awarded an A grade rose to 26.7%.

Does "some" mean "around"? If it does, why is it followed by a number given to the units digit?

Thanks in advance
Full Member346
ChristanfordHi,

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2009/aug/21/university-places-filling-rapidly

A record number of university applicants and the recession are thought to have made the desperate scramble for places more intense than ever, with 1,813 more students securing places in the first day of clearing yesterday than this time last year.

Can I replace "in the first day" with "on the first day"? Yes

Some 377,658 students have confirmed their places – 31,601 more than last year – after the A-level pass rate climbed to 97.5% and the proportion of papers awarded an A grade rose to 26.7%.

Does "some" mean "around"? If it does, why is it followed by a number given to the units digit?
'Some' in this sentence actually carries 2 meanings. Although an exact number is quoted, it's actually a number that is increasing - by the time the reader sees the article, it will be inaccurate, so 'around' is appropriate. It 's also is kind of saying "gosh, isn't that a lot?!"

Thanks in advance

Full Member218
Thanks!
Is there any difference in what is conveyed between "in the first day" and "on the first day"? Is one more common than the other?

Thanks in advance!
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