Ok, I'm stumped. My boss feels that "is" is needed in this sentance:

People may be asked to do stuff, this includes, but is not limited to, doing X, Y, Z.

To my ear, the sentance sounds fine without "is."

Thoughts?
New Member01
I'm afraid I would take sides with your boss, Lemonizer. However, if you reworded the sentence slightly, you would not need 'is':

People may be asked to do stuff, including but not limited to X, Y and Z.

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YankeeI'm afraid I would take sides with your boss, Lemonizer. However, if you reworded the sentence slightly, you would not need 'is':

People may be asked to do stuff, including but not limited to X, Y and Z.

Amy,

Am I reading this thread right ? If my eyes don't deceive me, I believe the boss is the one insisting on "is" being needed. Emotion: smile
Senior Member3,816
LemonizerOk, I'm stumped. My boss feels that "is" is needed in this sentance:

People may be asked to do stuff, this includes, but is not limited to, doing X, Y, Z.

To my ear, the sentance sounds fine without "is."

Thoughts?
Please reread the original post as well as my first post, Goodman. Lemonizer apparently wanted to omit the word "is" from the phrase "includes but is not limited to" and the boss apparently insisted that the word "is" was necessary for that particular wording. I agreed with the boss: The word "is" should be there.

The word "is" is not necessary if the wording is changed to "including but not limited to".

Have you noticed the difference in the two structures now?
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Ok, my eyes did deceive me. .....I see it now, "include" vs "including". You are right!
However, the boss doesn't get a free pass. The original construction is a comma splice: two independent clauses joined by a comma. You need to use either a period or a semi-colon between them.
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Anonymous:
I agree with Grammar Geek. The sentence should read as follows:

"People may be asked to do stuff; this includes, but is not limited to, doing X, Y, Z."

OR

"People may be asked to do stuff. This includes, but is not limited to, doing X, Y, Z."

OR

"People may be asked to do stuff including, but not limited to, doing X, Y, Z."
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