invite / invitation?

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It used to be that the word “invite” was used as a verb while “invitation” was the noun. But now the word “invite” is often used as a noun as well, e.g. “We will send you the invite to the show.” Is this correct?
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Hi,

It used to be that the word “invite” was used as a verb while “invitation” was the noun. But now the word “invite” is often used as a noun as well, e.g. “We will send you the invite to the show.” Is this correct? No, I'd call this regional slang.

Clive
Veteran Member69,506
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Anonymous:
The verb "invite" in place of the noun "invitation" is never correct: (I INVITE you to a party. You receive my INVITATION.) This misuse of "invite" in place of the correct "invitation" probably began by someone trying to be funny. This jokey usage continued knowingly for a while, and those who used "invite" in this manner seemed to understand that they were using the word incorrectly. Unfortunately, the misuse has become so common that many no longer know that it is incorrect. Those who care about the English language will not indulge in this substandard usage. Carolyn Martin
Anonymous:
Althought commonly used, it is incorrect. You "invite" someone by sending him an "invitation". Using them interchangeably is very poor grammar. SO
Anonymous:
This use is ubiquitous in the U.S.; I would be reluctant to call it regional.
Anonymous:
I would have to say that I agree that it isn't regional. It's more like generational. Younger people use invite as a noun. Also, I do believe that Jed on the Beverly Hillbillies show used it that way too. For example, "Granny, did you send an invite to the Drysdales for vittles?" Poor grammer at the very least. It makes one sound as stupid as a Beverly Hillbilly. Where did this usage start?
Anonymous:
I wouldn't consider it a regional U.S. variation anymore. It's increasingly common throughout American English. I've noticed it become more common than the original "invitation" in the last few years. It still bothers me a bit, but this is how language changes...
Hi,

Is it found mainly in US speech?

Is it common in non-casual US writing?

Clive
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Anonymous:
I checked www.merriam-webster.com and "invite" is also considered as a noun.

Though informal, it seems that some verbs are now being considered as a noun.

Just like "install" as a substitute for "installation".
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