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Hi,

Is there a contraction form for "There are" in informal American English?

For example, we can contract " You are /ju/ /ɑ:r/ " to " You're /jʊr/ ". " They are /ðeɪ/ /ɑ:r/ " to " /ðer/ ", etc. Then, I have a question,

may I contract " There are /ðer/ /ɑ:r/ " to " /ðer/ " ? I mean, how do you prononce " There are " in informal American English, when you

are speaking very fast? Is there a contraction form for " There are" ?

Thanks for your help.
New Member35
.
There're /ðerər/.
.
Veteran Member88,893
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Mister Micawber.
There're /ðerər/.
.

Hi, Mister Micawber,

Thanks for taking your time to look at my question!

So, I can not speak " There are /ðer/ /ɑ:r/ " as " /ðer/ ", right? Are you sure that there is not any possibility? I just... Sometimes when I watch movies, I have been heard those actors saying " There are /ðer/ some ... ... ", which is also pronounced like, as you said, " There are /ðerər/ ". I just can not figure out that what these actors exactly said, " There are" - /ðer/ or /ðerər/.

Puzzled!
The way I see it... THERE ARE can come out this way:
/ðerər/
/ðərər/

THERE ARE is often replaced with THERE'S, here are some quicker ways to say it:
/ðərz/
/ðəz/ (even faster)

So, at maximum speed, I can imagine hearing something like "thus some apples" (/ðəs səm.../), instead of "There're some apples". So don't worry, you are not completely crazy. Fast speech turns everything into a bunch of weird sounds. Emotion: smile Then it might vary from person to person or from dialect to dialect.
Veteran Member5,652
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KooyeenThe way I see it... THERE ARE can come out this way:
/ðerər/
/ðərər/

THERE ARE is often replaced with THERE'S, here are some quicker ways to say it:
/ðərz/
/ðəz/ (even faster)

So, at maximum speed, I can imagine hearing something like "thus some apples" (/ðəs səm.../), instead of "There're some apples". So don't worry, you are not completely crazy. Fast speech turns everything into a bunch of weird sounds. Then it might vary from person to person or from dialect to dialect.

Okay, Kooyeen, thank you!
Anonymous:
Yes. The contraction of "there are" is "there're." Unfortunately, many people mistakenly use the contraction of "there is"- "there's" instead,which breaks the subject-verb agreement rules.
There + are > There + er > There're > There ( /r/ dissimilation)
Full Member381
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Anonymous:
Yea, this is correct grammar.

I also like how you added the > to make an easier flow.

Reach Tips
Anonymous:
Hey,
No I don't think there is a contraction for that. but there is they're which is they and are.
At first I thought it could be the're but I recently found that it does not exist. I guess if you
are talking fast you could just make it up and say there er which is pretty much the same
as there are.

Hope I could be as much help as possible!!
Emotion: smile
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