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Hi everyone! I came across this forum upon searching for an answer to this query I have. I've always believed it to be "well written" because "well" is an adverb simply describing the passive adjective "written," where hyphenation is only necessary if an adjective is describing another adjective ("open-minded" for instance). However, I see "well-written" very frequently, and it seems to be the more widely accepted convention.

Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks in advance. Emotion: smile
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Ryanz0rHi everyone! I came across this forum upon searching for an answer to this query I have. I've always believed it to be "well written" because "well" is an adverb simply describing the passive adjective "written," where hyphenation is only necessary if an adjective is describing another adjective ("open-minded" for instance). However, I see "well-written" very frequently, and it seems to be the more widely accepted convention.

Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks in advance. Emotion: smile
My two cents:

If the compound adjective ("well written") precedes a noun, use a hyphen. If the elements--for example,"well" and "written"-- come after a noun, don't use the hyphen.

This is a well-written article.

This article is well written.
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Anonymous:
Hi,

I will give it a shot....

This novel is well written – passive, “well” modifies “written”.

This is a well-written novel- "Well-written" now is used as adjective to describe the novel. Note it that a hyphen is typically used in this form.

This is a piece of "badly-damaged" furiture. No one will buy it.- hyphenated as adj.

The piece of furiture is "badly damaged". No one will buy it.- adverb modifying verb
Hmm, that indeed seems acceptable, but I still fail to understand why an adverb and adjective must become a hyphenate. Emotion: tongue tied Is it simply a bizarre exception that we have to conform to? It is perfectly fine to have "a brilliantly written article," so why not "well" instead of "brilliantly" (as an example)?
Ryanz0rHmm, that indeed seems acceptable, but I still fail to understand why an adverb and adjective must become a hyphenate. Emotion: tongue tied Is it simply a bizarre exception that we have to conform to? It is perfectly fine to have "a brilliantly written article," so why not "well" instead of "brilliantly" (as an example)?
Because the hyphenation rule that we are talking doesn't apply for adverbs that end with "ly".

(E-x)

1. They are thoroughly tested materials. (Not, thoroughly-tested)

2. The remarkably hot day suddenly turned into a remarkably rainy day.(Not remarkably-hot day and remarkably-rainy day)
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Aha! So "well" is irregular for more than the fact that it does not end "ly" as the majority of adverbs do? That solves my predicament, thanks very much! Emotion: smile
Ryanz0rAha! So "well" is irregular for more than the fact that it does not end "ly" as the majority of adverbs do? That solves my predicament, thanks very much! Emotion: smile
NP.Emotion: smile
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Thank you.

Would you definitely say that the following underlined part in the sentence of yours needs to be hyphenated because I think it might not be?

This is a piece of "badly-damaged" furniture. No one will buy it.
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Use the hyphen.
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