I've got / I've gotten?

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Anonymous:
Hello,
The topic is the question. What's correct?
e.g. "I've got to do something" or "I've gotten to do something"?
According to my (computerized) dictionary, the past participle of 'get' is 'gotten', so why do I hear so many people say "I've got"?

Best Regards,
Itay
Anonymous:
I 've "gotton" a raise is a more formal way of saying "I've a rasie". Both form are correct. In real life, most people use " I've got ........"
AnonymousHello,
The topic is the question. What's correct?
e.g. "I've got to do something" or "I've gotten to do something"?
According to my (computerized) dictionary, the past participle of 'get' is 'gotten', so why do I hear so many people say "I've got"?

Best Regards,
Itay

In British English:

"I've got to do something" = it is imperative that I take action or experience something (action not yet done)

In American English:

"I've gotten to do something"? = I have had the pleasure, chance, possibilty to do or experience something. (action done)
Senior Member3,149
I see...
So, for example, is "I've never got a pay raise" grammatically correct? Or should it rather be "I've never gotten a pay raise"?
The way I get it now, "I've gotten" is present perfect while "I've got" isn't. Am I right? So what is "I've got"?

Itay
New Member01
ItayI see...
So, for example, is "I've never got a pay raise" grammatically correct? Or should it rather be "I've never gotten a pay raise"?
The way I get it now, "I've gotten" is present perfect while "I've got" isn't. Am I right? So what is "I've got"?

Itay
"I've never + past participle" is the present perfect there. It can be followed by "got" or "gotten" What you need to do is look for the meaning of the verb each time Bothe "got" and "gotten" have quite a few meanings. Take a look for them in a good dictionary. Then you could read this:

http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/got.html

or this:
Anonymous:
They both exist but they don't mean the same thing: I've got to do something means: I must do something,
I've gotten to do something means: I had the opportunity to do it and did it.
Anonymous:
hello,

if you're trying to say "i have to/must do something," then they-i've got and i've gotten-are both incorrect. past participle isn't what you want to use. that's more for explaining what you have done before (in the past).

e.g. i've run a marathon or i've gotten a speeding ticket

i've got to do something or i've got a sore throat... these are examples of bad grammar slipping into american slang.

e.g. if i was you (incorrect) vs. if i were you (correct)

many people say it as it's accepted in everyday slang, but the youth don't realize it's bad grammar, unfortunately.
Hi Anon,

The original post was from 2006. Probably that person is no longer around to hear your suggestions.
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Anonymousi've got to do something or i've got a sore throat... these are examples of bad grammar slipping into american slang.
Sorry, Anon, but the expression "have got to do something" (meaning "must do something") is quite standard and accepted. "Have got" meaning "have" (in the sense of "possess") is also accepted.

If you don't believe me, just take a look at some reputable dictionaries, for example. You'll find that none of them consider these expressions to be slang -- or even particularly informal, for that matter. Look at the usage note and also definition 63 (have got to) here, for example:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/have+got?r=66

Speaking of bad language habits, you might want to consider taking a critical look at the complete lack of capitalization in your post. Emotion: wink
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