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Boss's or Boss'?

Why?

Thank you in advance!
Regular Member717
Regarding the Jones question, is it one person or two?

Did you see Jennifer Jones's new boyfriend? What a hunk! (Singular s's)

The party will be at the Joneses' house (plural of Jones being Joneses, and a plural possessive goes s')

Boss's singular - The office party will be at my boss's house.

The only exception to the singular rule is Jesus'.

If your company has a house style guide, it can override these rules.
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Thank you !
Emotion: smile
Anonymous:
THe Boss's dog means that there is only one Boss who owns a dog. The Boss' dog means that a number of Bosses own the dog.
Hi,

THe Boss's dog means that there is only one Boss who owns a dog.

The Boss' dog means that a number of Bosses own the dog. No. Say the bosses' dog.

Best wishes,Clive
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Anonymous:
it is Jones'
Anonymous:
BarbaraPAThe only exception to the singular rule is Jesus'.
As a matter of fact, there is a second exception, "Moses'," as in "Moses' staff." The reason is that both "Jesus" and "Moses" are two-syllable names in which both the first and second syllables end in "s." The possessive of "Francis," for example, is not "Francis' " but "Francis's" because the syllable division is after the "n" and not the "c" However, many if not most of the institutions named for St. Francis use the apostrophe only. The (London) Times Guide to English Style and Usage refers to this as a house style to be observed as encountered.
BarbaraPAThe only exception to the singular rule is Jesus'.
In BE, Jesus's is just fine.
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Anonymousthere is a second exception, "Moses'," ...
In the sources I've read, there are even more exceptions. I've read that most names from classical Greek times and names from the Bible that end in s take only an apostrophe. Socrates', Euripides', Aristoxenes', Jonas', etc.

CJ
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