Kammer-junker.

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Qp10qp:
The term "kammer-junker" often crops up in my translation of Chekhov, but what is a kammer-junker?
I can't believe it's a valid English term, so I'm wondering if it stands for something untranslatable. I can't find it in my English or German dictionaries (though literally, in German, it would be "chamber squire"). I'm guessing it means something like a courtier or sinecure holder, though Chekhov never shows a kammer-junker in action, and the translator could have used one of those words if she'd wanted.
Example:
After ten o'clock he carefully dressed, often in evening dress, very rarely in his kammer-junker's uniform, and went out, returning in the morning. (An Anonymous Story.)
Peasemarch.
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Martin Ambuhl:
[nq:1]The term "kammer-junker" often crops up in my translation of Chekhov, but what is a kammer-junker?[/nq]
"Kammerjunker" is a historical German term roughly translated into English as "gentleman-in-waiting" or "gentleman-of-the-bed-chamber" or, sometimes, "groom of the bed-chamber."
It was common to use their supposed common characteristic of combed-out side whiskers in stereotypical descriptions.
"Kammer" ("chamber") occurs in English in the similar "chamberlain" (German "Kammerherr").
Here is a passage from the Encyclopedia Britannica under "Pushkin" as an example of use:
In 1831 Pushkin married Natalya Nikolayevna Goncharova and settled in St. Petersburg. Once more he took up government service and was commissioned to write a history of Peter the Great. Three years later he received the rank of Kammerjunker (gentleman of the emperor's bedchamber), partly because the tsar wished Natalya to have the entrée to court functions. The social life at court, which he was now obliged to lead and which his wife enjoyed, was ill-suited to creative work, but he stubbornly continued to write.
And here is a poem by Christian Winther:
En Kammerjunker
Heel mageligt i Morgendragt
Han havde sig i Vindvet lagt,
Og nød den friske, aarle Luft
I Pagt med en Havanas Duft.
Da faldt der fra Bolværkets Rand
Ud i Kanalens grønne Vand
En fattig Dreng. Ved dette Syn
Var han paa Gaden som et Lyn;
Af Klæderne kom han saa brat,
Som vinked ham en Brudenat.
Han over Randen rask sig svang,
I stinkende Kanal han sprang,
Og frelste ud af Dødens Garn
Med kraftig Haand det stakkels Barn.
Nu efter ædel Brug og Skik
Han redningshæderstegnet fik.
Og jeg har hørt, han tidt har sagt:
„Jeg har jo nok af alskens Pragt;
Mig Titler, Stjerner, Kors og Baand
Blev skjænket af en naadig Haand,
Men denne lille, ringe Mønt
Er dog min Dolmans bedste Pynt!“
Jeg troer, det var en Ridder med
Sit Hjerte paa det rette Sted.
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Skitt:
[nq:1]The term "kammer-junker" often crops up in my translation of Chekhov, but what is a kammer-junker? I can't believe it's ... often in evening dress, very rarely in his kammer-junker's uniform, and went out, returning in the morning. (An Anonymous Story.)[/nq]
It is a butler.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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