Ketchup in the UK

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Stuart Chapman:
The 'Cider and Beer' thread above got me looking at a site with traditional English recipes.
I noticed that for a 'Traditional English Breakfast', tomato ketchup is recommended as a condiment.
Firstly, is ketchup idiom in the UK? (News to me if it is).

Secondly, are there types of ketchup other than tomato?

Thirdly, how does UK ketchup differ from US ketchup? (I'm suspecting its in the texture and sugar level).
Here in OZ, a sauce made from tomato is by convention called tomato sauce, or oftenly, sauce. Ketchup is also available at the supermarket (among other brands, Heinz IIRC, which also makes tomato sauce) but I've never bought it and compared it with tomato sauce.

Some time ago in the US, I ordered a hot dog with tomato sauce. No questions were asked, and I was served a hot dog topped with chopped tomato.

Stupot
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the Omrud:
[nq:1]The 'Cider and Beer' thread above got me looking at a site with traditional English recipes. I noticed that for a 'Traditional English Breakfast', tomato ketchup is recommended as a condiment. Firstly, is ketchup idiom in the UK? (News to me if it is).[/nq]
Yes (if I parse your question correct).
[nq:1]Secondly, are there types of ketchup other than tomato?[/nq]
I don't think so.
[nq:1]Thirdly, how does UK ketchup differ from US ketchup? (I'm suspecting its in the texture and sugar level).[/nq]
Superficially, they appear the same. I've never analysed the contents lists.
[nq:1]Here in OZ, a sauce made from tomato is by convention called tomato sauce, or oftenly, sauce. Ketchup is also ... hot dog with tomato sauce. No questions were asked, and I was served a hot dog topped with chopped tomato.[/nq]
They may have been trying to create tomato salsa.

David
==
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Charles Riggs:
[nq:1]The 'Cider and Beer' thread above got me looking at a site with traditional English recipes. I noticed that for a 'Traditional English Breakfast', tomato ketchup is recommended as a condiment.[/nq]
Hmm. A slice of fried tomato is nearly always seen in a 'Traditional Irish Breakfast', but I've never seen anyone put ketchup on anything but the chips if they are part of it, which they seldom are. The eggs, rashers, black pudding, white toast, and either tea or coffee are essentials, though. Orange juice, fruit, cold cereal, and especially dark bread, often. Baked beans, sometimes, but always, it seems, in the type of place I'd avoid like the plague. The supermarket diner in Westport, for example, included them.

Charles Riggs
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Wood Avens:
[nq:2]Secondly, are there types of ketchup other than tomato?[/nq]
[nq:1]I don't think so.[/nq]
I seem to recall having heard of mushroom ketchup.

Yes, here we are - Google offers 529 results, including this recipe from Mrs Beeton:
http://thefoody.com/mrsbpreserve/mketchup.html
"Choose fully grown mushrooms and take care they are freshly gathered when the weather is tolerably dry ..."

Katy Jennison
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John Dean:
[nq:1]Secondly, are there types of ketchup other than tomato?[/nq]
The Ketchup man travels the world so you don't have to.

http://www.ketchupworld.com/ketchupnews.html

John Dean
Oxford
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Don Phillipson:
[nq:1]Firstly, is ketchup idiom in the UK? (News to me if it is). Secondly, are there types of ketchup other ... other brands, Heinz IIRC, which also makes tomato sauce) but I've never bought it and compared it with tomato sauce.[/nq]
The word originates in South Asia (e.g. Malay kechap) meaning a spicy sauce, not originally made with tomatos since tomatos were not grown there in the 19th century when colonials brought the word back to Britain, Netherlands etc. As other posters noted, ketchup can be made with a large range of materials, not necessarily tomatos: it may even include nuoc mam = fermented fish sauce, i.e. this is a matter of cuisine rather than linguistics. The American association of ketchup with tomato sauce
appears to be an artifact of food brand advertising.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
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Roland Hutchinson:
[nq:2]I don't think so.[/nq]
[nq:1]I seem to recall having heard of mushroom ketchup. Yes, here we are - Google offers 529 results, including this recipe from Mrs Beeton: http://thefoody.com/mrsbpreserve/mketchup.html "Choose fully grown mushrooms and take care they are freshly gathered when the weather is tolerably dry ..."[/nq]
One (i.e. either my spouse or myself, I forget which) has purchased commercially prepared mushroom catsup in a bottle at a grocery store here in New Jersey (MDPSIA), though it was not your ordinary supermarket but rather a place that often gets lots of odd, overstocked, or discontinued items, frequently imported, that we never see again. We never saw it again. Very nice as an addition to sauces, stews, etc., it was, too. This version, at least, was a thin, brown liquid.

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

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Bob Cunningham:
[nq:1]Firstly, is ketchup idiom in the UK? (News to me if it is).[/nq]
When we were in England in the late seventies, we dined very informally with an English family in Slough. There was a bottle of American ketchup on the table, of course clearly labeled "Ketchup". When the English people wanted some, they said "Please pass the sauce".
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Roland Hutchinson:
To an American, tomato sauce means either a sort of thin puree of tomato put up in cans by a large food-processing company and generally used as an ingredient in cooking or in preparing more elaborate sauces rather than as something eaten just as it comes out of the can, or some version of Italian marinara, sauce bolognese, commercial spaghetti sauce that comes in from the supermarket and may or may not be identifiable as in any way being Italian in derivation, or else some other tomato-based sauce that food is cooked in or served in. Note that in all cases the sauce is integral to the dish it is used in, or at the very least poured over or around it liberally; it is not used as a mere condiment.
The one thing that "tomato sauce" never means in AmE is a tomato ketchup, and it is very disorienting to American ears to hear Brits refer to ketchup as "tomato sauce". What, we wonder, do they call actual (=BrE proper) tomato sauce?
This is almost, but not quite, as disorienting as being asked if you want salad on your hamburger.

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

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