laid or layed?

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Anonymous:
Which is correct to write: I laid in bed waiting for the clock to sound, or I layed in bed...?
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Approved answer (verified by )
Hi,

The verb you're looking for is lie (lay, lain).

present: I usually lie in bed waiting for...
past simple: [Yesterday] I lay in bed waiting for ...
past progressive: I was lying in bed waiting for ... when ...

The verb lay (laid, laid) is transitive, so you need an object; for instance, you could say (in the past), "I laid the baby on the bed."
As far as I know, "layed" is not a word.

See also:
Lie lay
lay or lie
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Approved answer (verified by )
I would agree with Tanit. Also, "waiting for the clock to sound" is quite an unusual phrase. It suggests a very unusual kind of clock.

(If your clock is an ordinary alarm clock, you are "waiting for the alarm to go off"; if it's a public clock, outside your bedroom, you are "waiting for the clock to strike".

MrP
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Anonymous:
Layed is not a word. Use laid.
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AnonymousLayed is not a word. Use laid.

That is, use "laid" if it's the right word. In many cases, "lay" is actually the right word.
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Anonymous:
Thanks I needed that laid out for me?
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Anonymous:
Is it: she layed her head back or laid her head back?
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AnonymousIs it: she layed her head back or laid her head back?

Never use "layed." It's not a word. Eliminate it from your memory! Emotion: smile
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And yet, I feel it ought to be (a word). It might be the minor official who attends the Vizier at his morning levee, perhaps duly apostrophised (la'yed) and faintly guttural. His principal function would, historically, have been the daily waxing of the vice-regal moustaches; though in later ages he wielded considerable powers of patronage. His wife was generally known as the laye'di (note the different accentuation).
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