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hi there
Is it ok to say
"I will be late in the office"?
Also what sounds better
out of office or out of the office. ?
thanks
New Member21
I would say that "I will be late in the office" is just barely OK. It's a bit clipped, but I can imagine someone saying it to mean "I will be working late in the office / at the office."

"The boss will be out of the office." sounds better than "The boss will be out of office."
But as an adjective, we could have:
"I set up an out-of-office message on my phone." That sounds better than "I set up an out-of-the-office message on my phone."

So it really depends on how it is used in the sentence!

Emotion: geeked
Veteran Member53,486
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Thanks, that is very helpful.
Would you use "I will be late in the office tomorrow" to indicate that you will be late (for example because you have an appointment) tomorrow? Many thanks
Sofia
>"I will be late in the office"
It is perfectly fine.
I can only say it is perfect, flawless!

>out of office or out of the office.
A matter of personal style.
Out of the office - See: http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/040921/latu063_1.html
Out of office - See: http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/Stories/0,1413,106~4992~2429903,00.html
Full Member125
>"I will be late in the office tomorrow" to indicate that you will be late (for example because you
> have an appointment) tomorrow?

Why not?
Personally, I would not use "I will be late in the office tomorrow" with that meaning. However, it would be acceptable to do so, and many people say it that way.
I prefer, "I will be late to the office tomorrow."

To me, "late in the office" means "staying in the office later than usual".
"late to the office" means "arriving at the office later than usual".

Emotion: smile
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Maybe we can take the question in that way.
Since I have an appointment tomorrow afternoon, I will work/be late in the office in order to finish all my jobs.

Since I have an appointment tomorrow afternoon, I will work/be late in the office in order to finish all my jobs.


Since I have an appointment tomorrow afternoon, I will work late to finish all my jobs. [my preference.]

Since I have an appointment tomorrow afternoon, I will work late at the office to finish all my jobs. [ok]

I am not sure why, but I tend to use "at the office" as opposed to 'in the office".

I will be at the office by 10:00 tomorrow. ok
I will be in the office by 10:00 tomorrow. ok

You can call me at the office tomorrow. ok
You can call me in the office tomorrow. ok, but I prefer the one above.

Those are my two cents.

MountainHiker
Senior Member2,528
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Thanks, your examples are very useful. Regarding "at" instead of "in", would that apply to the following sentences?
"I will meet you at the hotel"
"I will be at the airport at 4:30 pm"
Thanks
Sofia
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