Looking for expressions similar to "to take leave"

This is a discussion thread · 6 replies
Gloria Huang:
In Chinese, we have a verbial phrase "Qing Jia", and we use it like, "I have to 'Qing Jia' today because I'm sick or I have something to take care of."
We can use this phrase in scenerios like being at school or at work or even in the military.
It seems to me that "to take leave" has the same meaning but it is used mainly in military.
At work, ppl say, "She called in sick." or "She's not coming today because she's sick." or "She has today off."
My question is, at school, what would you say when a student didn't come to the class besides "she's not here today."?

And is there a general expression/term/phrase like that in Chinese?

Thank you in advance!
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
John Ings:
[nq:1]In Chinese, we have a verbial phrase "Qing Jia", and we use it like, "I have to 'Qing Jia' today ... didn't come to the class besides "she's not here today."? And is there a general expression/term/phrase like that in Chinese?[/nq]
There are various usages in English which would apply.

A student not present at school is simply "absent", and may show up the next day with a note from their parents explaining that they were sick or had a dentist appointment or whatever. If however their absence was not legitimate they are said to be "playing hooky" or "cutting classes" or "skipping classes". Of course any high school student will have a current slang term for the same thing that won't be the same next year, so there's no point in trying to keep current with that sort of argot unless YOU are a high school student!:-)

In the work place most employees are allowed in their contracts a certain number of paid sick days off. So formally an employee might "call in sick" and "take a sick day off". Colloquially this is sometimes referred to as "taking a sickie".
General colloquial terms referring to departure can also be used in such situations. A person can "skive off", "take French leave", "fade into the woodwork", "*** off" (that one isn't used in polite company), "take a hike", "abscond" or "go AWOL". That last is a military expression meaning 'Absent WithOut Leave'.
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
V Zhang:
Hi Gloria,
We usually say "to take sick leave" as the expression of "Qin Bing jia" (in Chinese) in company. I think the phrase "to take sick leave" is a general expression which can be used both in military and under other situation, isn't it?
Regards,
Vic Zhang
===
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
V Zhang:
There is some different to China about "absent" in school. If one will take some kind of leave, eg. sick leave, he should explain the reason of leave first by call or leaving message in advance. (If he's a high school student or younger, his parent should explain the reason.)

If a kid is absent for class without any explanation in advance, the class director will call his parent for the reason. Such can avoid the accident before it really occurs.
Vic Zhang
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Gloria Huang:
[nq:2]In Chinese, we have a verbial phrase "Qing Jia", and ... And is there a general expression/term/phrase like that in Chinese?[/nq]
[nq:1]There are various usages in English which would apply. A student not present at school is simply "absent", and may ... in polite company), "take a hike", "abscond" or "go AWOL". That last is a military expression meaning 'Absent WithOut Leave'.[/nq]
Thank you, John, for such a detailed explanation.
You see, things are a bit different here. A student has to say why he/she can't attend the class before or when he/she does so. Actually, the question was brought up when a teacher asked me in class how to tell the foreign teacher that one student "Qing Jia". The first thing came to my mind was "She's not here today." But she already knew that and wondered if there's a similar expression in English to "Qing Jia." "Qing Jia" states the fact without giving you the reason. I wonder if "absent" means the same thing.
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
John Ings:
[nq:1]You see, things are a bit different here. A student has to say why he/she can't attend the class before or when he/she does so.[/nq]
Even in the case of sudden illness or family emergency?
[nq:1]Actually, the question was brought up when a teacher asked me in class how to tell the foreign teacher that ... "Qing Jia." "Qing Jia" states the fact without giving you the reason. I wonder if "absent" means the same thing.[/nq]
Yes, it means "not there" without a reason being specified. If you want to refer to an absence that has been cleared ahead of time with the school office, like a scheduled dental appointment, you might say "She's been excused for the afternoon".
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Gloria Huang:
[nq:2]You see, things are a bit different here. A student has to say why he/she can't attend the class before or when he/she does so.[/nq]
[nq:1]Even in the case of sudden illness or family emergency?[/nq]
Normally, even if it's a sudden illness or family emergency, the parents are required to make a phone call to the school and state the reason. It makes sense. Suppose a student was kidnapped on the way to school, the teacher noticed the student was absent, and instead of contacting the parents to inquire, she assumed the student was just sick. And the parents had no idea that their son didn't make it to the school. It'd be really serious.
[nq:2]Actually, the question was brought up when a teacher asked ... the reason. I wonder if "absent" means the same thing.[/nq]
[nq:1]Yes, it means "not there" without a reason being specified. If you want to refer to an absence that has been cleared ahead of time with the school office, like a scheduled dental appointment, you might say "She's been excused for the afternoon".[/nq]
I got it. Thank you so much!
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Live chat
Registered users can join here