May he rest in peace

This is a discussion thread · 37 replies
1 2 3 4 5
masahiko:
When the phrase " may he rest in peace " is inserted in the sentence without any words referring to his death, is it a kind of euphemistic expression to tell the reader about his death?
The woman, who had the same hairstyle as Linda and the same way of dressing, began telling Linda a story about when she and her husband may he rest in peace had arrived in Karachi, Pakistan
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
CyberCypher:
masahiko (Email Removed) wrote on 13 Nov 2003:
[nq:1]When the phrase " may he rest in peace " is inserted in the sentence without any words referring to his death, is it a kind of euphemistic expression to tell the reader about his death?[/nq]
It doesn't tell "about" his death; it tells the reader only that he is dead. It is probably what the woman said when she began her story: "When my husband may he rest in peace and I arrived in Karachhi, . . . "
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Donna Richoux:
[nq:2]When the phrase " may he rest in peace " ... of euphemistic expression to tell the reader about his death?[/nq]
[nq:1]It doesn't tell "about" his death; it tells the reader only that he is dead. It is probably what the ... story: "When my husband may he rest in peace and I arrived in Karachhi, . . . "[/nq]
[nq:2]The woman, who had the same hairstyle as Linda and ... her husband may he rest in peace had arrived in Karachi, Pakistan [/nq]
My guess is that some cultures have a custom of saying a little blessing whenever they mention the name of a dead person, or at least a loved one. Something like that. It's not an everyday custom in the US or England, but it's not very strange, either.

Best Donna Richoux
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Evan Kirshenbaum:
[nq:1]My guess is that some cultures have a custom of saying a little blessing whenever they mention the name of ... one. Something like that. It's not an everyday custom in the US or England, but it's not very strange, either.[/nq]
The Hebrew equivalent, used by some in English, is "alav hashalom" (peace be on him), although "May he rest in peace" is common, too, among, especially, elderly Jews. I'd expect it from the same people (my late grandmother, for instance) who say "kinehora" (or "ken ayn ahora", "no evil eye") after mentioning some bit of good fortune.

The latter stems from a superstitious(1) fear that mentioning good fortune in the presence of one with the "evil eye" (and you never know...) might cause it to be taken away, but that the phrase wards it off. I don't know if there's a similar belief that speaking of the dead might cause them to not be peaceful unless similarly warded off.
(1) Yes, I know. In Jewish circles, this is considered a superstition.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >If all else fails, embarrass the
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >industry into doing the rightPalo Alto, CA 94304 >thing.

(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
R F:
[nq:2]My guess is that some cultures have a custom of ... the US or England, but it's not very strange, either.[/nq]
[nq:1]The Hebrew equivalent, used by some in English, is "alav hashalom" (peace be on him), although "May he rest in peace" is common, too, among, especially, elderly Jews.[/nq]
Fat Moe said it in Once Upon A Time In America when speaking of his father. (Note: This posting is justified under Principle Q (q.v.).)
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Dr Robin Bignall:
[nq:2]My guess is that some cultures have a custom of ... the US or England, but it's not very strange, either.[/nq]
[nq:1]The Hebrew equivalent, used by some in English, is "alav hashalom" (peace be on him), although "May he rest in ... "evil eye" (and you never know...) might cause it to be taken away, but that the phrase wards it off.[/nq]
Interesting, Evan. My father, who was quite superstitious, would say "Cross fingers", and cross his fingers, in that situation.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Robert Lieblich:
[nq:2]My guess is that some cultures have a custom of ... the US or England, but it's not very strange, either.[/nq]
[nq:1]The Hebrew equivalent, used by some in English, is "alav hashalom" (peace be on him), although "May he rest in ... to not* be peaceful unless similarly warded off. (1) Yes, I know. In *Jewish circles, this is considered a superstition.[/nq]
There's a delightful one-person show that I saw off-Broadway in which a woman in her thirties tells us about her two (fictionalized) grandmothers. One of them insisted on addressing her as "Mieskeit" (literally "ugliness" but also used of persons) lest the evil eye take away her good looks.
Pure superstition, but touching.

Bob Lieblich
Who can't remember the name and can't find it on the Web
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Evan Kirshenbaum:
[nq:2]The Hebrew equivalent, used by some in English, is "alav ... be taken away, but that the phrase wards it off.[/nq]
[nq:1]Interesting, Evan. My father, who was quite superstitious, would say "Cross fingers", and cross his fingers, in that situation.[/nq]
We cross our fingers, too,(1) but not in that situation. For me, crossing fingers is an attempt to ensure that something good happens, not an attempt to ensure that something that has already happened doesn't get negated. "Kinehora" would typically be used after commenting on someone's good health, recovery from illness, advanced age, recent success, or obvious talent. Of course, in actual use, it's mostly really "Not that I'm bragging", especially when the person being described is a child or grandchild, in much the same way that "Cross your fingers" is really "Here's hoping".
(1) Yeah, I know, but if Christians can incorporate pagan superstitions, Jews can incorporate Christian ones.(2)

(2) At least, I presume that this notion of making a cross is a Christian superstition, although I guess it's possible they picked it up from others. It seems to be perceived as Christian by Jews embarassed at catching themselves doing it.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Of course, over the first 10^-10
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >seconds and 10^-30 cubicPalo Alto, CA 94304 >centimeters it averages out to

(650)857-7572 > Philip Morrison

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Evan Kirshenbaum:
[nq:1]There's a delightful one-person show that I saw off-Broadway in which a woman in her thirties tells us about her ... looks. Pure superstition, but touching. Bob Lieblich Who can't remember the name and can't find it on the Web[/nq]
I'm guessing Bubbe Meises , by Ellen Gould. I never saw it, but I've heard good things about it.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Pious Jews have a category of
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >questions that can harmlessly bePalo Alto, CA 94304 >allowed to go without an answer

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Show more
Live chat
Registered users can join here