Meaning of bias against or bias towards

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Bias against or bias towards what r the meanings of these two terms ? Is bias against mean: u r against somebody b'coz of pre set mindset and bias towards mean: u r in the favor of it ?

Would it be right to say : I have bias towards truth ? Means I'm inclined towards truth.
Full Member432
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Hi Razer

I am tremendously biased against the type of spelling (misspelling) you used in your post.
If you are truly sincere in wanting to improve your English, you should attempt to spell properly when you post a question here. That may help people feel a much more positive bias towards answering your questions.
Emotion: wink
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Razer Would it be right to say : I have bias towards truth ?
It may be right, but it's extremely rare to use the noun as an uncountable. It's more common to say:

I have a bias toward truth.

or the participle / adjective I am biased toward [the] truth.
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"It may be right, but it's extremely rare to use the noun as an uncountable. It's more common to say: I have a bias toward truth."
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Thanks Avangi for your reply. But still I have some doubts if it's "rare" to use the noun as uncountable then why the word money is considered as uncountable singular noun ? There are many such examples, I'm giving you just one to present my case.

Other than this I'd like to show you a reply of another academician who disagrees with you. According to him, "no one would say a bias towards the truth, a bias is only in subjective matters of opinion". Here is the link of that discussion: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/99429-towards-against-bias-confusion.html

Please shed more light on it.

Thanks
Yankee, thanks for your reply too. Got what you were trying to say in "sarcastic" manner.
RazerYankee, thanks for your reply too. Got what you were trying to say in "sarcastic" manner.

I don't think Yankee was sarcastic!Emotion: whisper
Full Member292
She might be or might not be "sarcastic" it depends upon how one sees it. I don't think it's matter of debate here.
Hi, Razer. If I may answer in a humorous vein, one bad analogy ("the weakest form of argument") deserves another. To use the fact noun X has both a countable and non-countable use, as a proof that noun Y should also; is about as futile as saying that if noun C is used with preposition Z, then noun D must be also. That is, these things defy logic, and usage is subject to change through the ages. Whether or not a particular noun has both a countable and a non-countable usage is strictly a matter of what's idiomatic, not what's logical.
In some cases, the countable and uncountable almost seem to have different meanings.

(Please excuse me. I have an interruption. I'll try to get back on the second part of your question.)Emotion: happy
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YankeeHi RazerI am tremendously biased against the type of spelling (misspelling) you used in your post. If you are truly sincere in wanting to improve your English, you should attempt to spell properly when you post a question here. That may help people feel a much more positive bias to wards answering your questions. [more...]
Yankee, you are rude and were wrong to criticize this person. there is nothing wrong with Razer's spelling. what? because he spelled the word "because" as "b'coz"? even fluent english speakers do that sort of thing. it's called a shortcut. you know that as well as i do.

now, his sentence structure is off a little, but obviously english is not his first language. this is a forum for help with the english language, is it not?

you should think before making a false criticism and making someone feel stupid.
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