Meaning 'Let's get going'. Unit 6

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Hi Teachers,

According to this context, what is the meaning of 'let's get going'? Is it like 'We should start now!'? If not could you suggest one and tell me if it is an idiom or an idiomatic phrase?

Thanks in advance


Baxter got off the train at a small station. There was a detective waiting for him on the platform. He shook Baxter’s hand.

Halls:

My name is Halls, Tom Halls. Scotland Yard phoned us and told us to meet you here. There’s a car waiting.

Narrator:

Baxter wasted very little time on social formalities.

Baxter:

Coke escaped more than 24 hours ago. I want to catch him before another 24 hours are up.

Narrator:

Halls looked at Baxter for a few seconds before he answered.

Halls:

A lot of us wonder why Scotland Yard is so interested in this fellow Coke. He isn’t the first one to escape. Another man did only about six months ago, but Scotland Yard didn’t send anyone to help us then.

Narrator:

Baxter was already half-way to the car before he said anything.

Baxter:

Coke isn’t just an ordinary prisoner. He’s very special. Let’s get going!
Veteran Member5,274
"We whould start now" is good, TS.

"Quick, let's be on our way" works too.

John
Senior Member3,043
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Hi John,

Thanks for you reply, so both can be possible according to the context.

a) We should start now.

b) Quick, let's be on our way.

Best,

TS
Is it 'let's get going' an idiomatic phrase?
No, TS - there is nothing figurative about the phrase - it's not idiomatic.

And, yes, given the context both "a" and "b" would be correct.

An idiomatic phrase is something like "lend me a hand". It means to help someone do something. Of course you cannot lend someone your hand. It's a figurative expression.

Sorry I misspelled should in my earlier post. I think it’s time to quit for the day.

Cheers, John
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
Hi John,

Thank you for your reply.
JohnParisAn idiomatic phrase is something like "lend me a hand". It means to help someone do something. Of course you cannot lend someone your hand. It's a figurative expression.
Ok. So it is an idiom.

Best,

TS
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