which is correct and when should we use these

meeting is scheduled or meeting has been scheduled.

I am not a native speaker.Please help me understand these difference
New Member14
They're both correct and they both describe the exact same situation. "Has been scheduled" focuses more on the action which took place to schedule the meeting, but both are forms of present tense, passive voice. You could argue that "is scheduled" is verb+adjective complement, similar to "the store is closed / has been closed."

"The meeting is scheduled for seven o'clock tomorrow night" and "the meeting has been scheduled for seven o'clock tomorrow night" describe the exact same situation.

It might be easier to understand the tense difference if you look at it in active voice:

I schedule the meeting for 7 pm. (present) I have scheduled the meeting for 7 pm. (present perfect)

He paints the car. He has painted the car. The car is painted. The car has been painted. (These all describe the exact same situation, except in the two perfect tenses the action has been completed.)

"The car is painted" has the same ambiguity as "the meeting is scheduled." It could mean, "The car is [being] painted," or it could mean, "This is a painted car." (adjective complement)
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Teachmepls
which is correct and when should we use these

meeting is scheduled or meeting has been scheduled.

I am not a native speaker.Please help me understand these difference
Don't use the wrong preposition. I notice many peope use 'on' instead of 'for'. E.g., The meeting has been scheduled on 28 January at 7pm.
Veteran Member8,073
I don't find "for" wrong.

It's VERY common to hear "The meeting's scheduled for next Tuesday - will that work for you?"
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Grammar Geek
I don't find "for" wrong.

It's VERY common to hear "The meeting's scheduled for next Tuesday - will that work for you?"

Hi Barbara

You've misunderstood my reply, which is reproduced below.

Don't use the wrong preposition. I notice many peope use 'on' instead of 'for'. E.g., The meeting has been scheduled on 28 January at 7pm. ( 'on' should not be used; use 'for')

I should have elaborated.

Ah, I see. On rereading, I get your meaning. Sorry for the confusion.
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Anonymous:
Thanks! It was helpful!
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