Anonymous:
Can the words 'most and almost be used as synonyms in informal language?

For example: "a car hit me and I 'most died"

And is it necessary to use the '-sign?
Hi,

Can the words 'most and almost be used as synonyms in informal language?

For example: "a car hit me and I 'most died" No.

Clive
Veteran Member69,519
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No.

Most - greatest, the best,
Almost - close, nearly
New Member01
In spoken English it might be difficult to hear the first syllable in the word 'almost', nevertheless, it is not actually dropped completely.
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Anonymous:
Here's an interesting article with regards to the confusion amongst Japanese learners of English:

Almost a Problem...

In What’s in a Word? In Japan Currents, July 1997: http://www.trussel.com/jap/almost.htm

Anonymous:
"Almost" is an adverb. It is synonymous with "nearly". It is usually followed by a number, a quantifier (all) or an participial adjective (finished)

"Most" can be an noun, adjective or adverb. It is usually followed by "of the + noun"

The meanings are very similar but the rules of when to use them differ.
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