Much Appreciated?

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Would you say "Much appreciated" as an equivalent to "Much obliged" in everyday conversation? I've personally only seen it in letters, faxes, etc in place of "Thanks" at the end of them practically meaning to tell the readers "This is the end of it." You say "Thank you. I appreciate it," but I wonder to 'say' "Much appreciated," with or without "Thank you" or "Thanks" preceding it, is idiomatic.

Hiro
Regular Member770
Approved answer (verified by )
HSSWould you say "Much appreciated" as an equivalent to "Much obliged" in everyday conversation?
Yes, and it's idiomatic with or without "Thank you" or "Thanks".

Nevertheless, though it is true that they are pretty much equivalent, I don't say either one, and I'm not so sure that these expressions fit squarely into the category of "everyday conversation". "Thank you" or "Thanks" is just fine.

It's amazing the number of creative ways non-native speakers find to say ordinary things. Native speakers are not at all so creative as that, using the same boring expressions over and over. (I actually think you'll sound more like a native speaker if you stick to the boring things!) Emotion: smile

CJ
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CJ,
I think you hit on a really interesting aspect of learning a language. Should the goal be to create a homogeneous population of English speakers who all use the same constructions in the same way?
Personally, I like the little idiosyncrasies of language that my Chinese and Indian and other foreign friends use in speaking English, and they all laugh at me when I mangle a simple sentence in Chinese.

I know we have to teach correct grammar and commonly acceptable usage, but I think the speaker's personality and vivacity should be allowed to come through in their quirks of language. The art of good communication does not require that the rules of grammar always be followed. Otherwise all the poets would go and drown themselves.

Native does not have to = boring! Emotion: smile

All the best,
TrysB
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CalifJim(I actually think you'll sound more like a native speaker if you stick to the boring things!)
That may be true! And I tend to use a lot of ham radio jargon in my talk off the air to non-radio operator and puzzle them. Will catch you further down the log.Emotion: smile
TrysBPersonally, I like the little idiosyncrasies of language that my Chinese and Indian and other foreign friends use in speaking English
You are a special case -- someone who is very interested in language. You may even be currently living in an academic environment where diversity is prized and encouraged. But the large majority of Americans are not the least bit amused by foreigners' bons mots. In fact, it's been my experience that a large number of them are completely hostile to such idiosyncrasies.
TrysBI think the speaker's personality and vivacity should be allowed to come through in their quirks of language.
After spending some years in an English-speaking country perhaps, and learning the "do's and dont's". First things first, I think, and getting creative and cute would not be first in my book.

Of course, I can only speak for myself. When I visit a foreign country, the last thing I want to do is appear quirky. It's bad enough that I don't "fit in" with a culture that's not mine, but fitting in even less by purposely choosing what I might mistakenly consider clever things to say is just inviting trouble. That only attracts the kind of attention I don't want, thank you very much. (If you've ever been spotted as a tourist and mugged in the Paris metro, you'll know what I mean.) Emotion: smile

CJ
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Anonymous:
The topic is interesting enough to attract a respone from me, a pole living in Ireland for 5 years now. Working in a bank among many nationalities made me think that your individuality is rather less important than your impact on a group - team that you're on. You can be both creative and not extand yourself in a negative way. I always appreciate the humor such people express.

Tom
Anonymous:
Dear Cj,

Just thought you should know, you made a very good point here. Emotion: smile Cheers.
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