Multiple unit

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Roger Jones:
In railway parlance, here at least, "multiple unit" means to connect two or more locomotives or railway power cars together so that one driver controls all the power units, and yes it is used as a verb. It is not at all uncommon to hear, for example, that "SCC power cars will not multiple unit". The participles, however, exist only in the initialism. So we could hear (and read) "4472 m.u.ed with 8001".
It is also interesting (to me) that in the verb form m.u. has the full stops whereas the qualified forms emu (acronym for electric multiple unit) and dmu (initialism for diesel multiple unit) don't. Remember, I'm Australian and our schooling actively discourages the use of full stops in acronyms, initialisms and abbreviations.
I've not been able to come up with any other similar phrases that operate as a verb, in the infinitive form only, but which can have other forms of the verb only as initialisms. Are there others (and do they have the faint odour of the oxymoron that "multiple unit" has)?
Roger
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R H Draney:
Roger Jones filted:
[nq:1]In railway parlance, here at least, "multiple unit" means to connect two or more locomotives or railway power cars together ... only as initialisms. Are there others (and do they have the faint odour of the oxymoron that "multiple unit" has)?[/nq]
Any number of initialisms function as verbs; "FTP" comes to mind, while a younger person might first think of "IM"...I can't think of any with the unique restriction you request..r
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Mark Brader:
Roger Jones:
[nq:1]In railway parlance, here at least, "multiple unit" means to connect two or more locomotives or railway power cars[/nq]
Also streetcars (trams).
[nq:1]together so that one driver controls all the power units,[/nq]
More specifically, it implies that each unit derives its power independently, with only control signals traveling from one to the other, so something that functions like a set of relays is required in each remotely controlled unit.
This is the norm now, but it wasn't always so. Before multiple-unit control was invented, some electric trains were built where the motors in two cars were simply powered directly from the one controller, requiring the cars to be connected by lines that could carry the full power that one car required.
(Today, ironically, the French TGV has a full-power line like that running along its roof, even though it has multiple-unit control. This line is live all the time, not switched; it's done because if pantographs were raised on both the front and rear cars, the overhead wire wouldn't have settled down from the passage of the first one before the second came along, and it wouldn't make good contact.)
[nq:1]and yes it is used as a verb.[/nq]
Indeed.
[nq:1]The participles, however, exist only in the initialism. So we could hear (and read) "4472 m.u.ed with 8001".[/nq]
Interesting point.
[nq:1]It is also interesting (to me (as an Australian)) that in the verb form m.u. has the full stops whereas the qualified forms emu (acronym for electric multiple unit) and dmu (initialism for diesel multiple unit) don't.[/nq]
I would normally write all of those as block-capitalized without periods. MU, MUed or MU'd, DMU, EMU. I do see lower-case dmu and emu in British publications, I guess, but they don't usually use MU on its own at all.

Note that although locomotives may be MUed together, if the term MU is applied to a passenger train, it means one where some or all of the cars are themselves powered and no locomotive is used. These trains are most often referred to as DMUs or EMUs, according to their motive power, and the term may also be used for one of the powered cars working alone (as that's sort of a degenerate case of such a train). The term "railcar" is also sometimes used for these. Unlike MU, DMU and EMU are only nouns or adjectives, not verbs.
The term DMU is in turn subcategorized according to how the power is transmitted from engine to wheels. If the diesel drives a generator and the wheels are powered electrically, as usual on diesel locomotives, that's a DEMU (diesel-electric); if it has a transmission like you'd find in a car, that's a DHMU (diesel-hydraulic, like a car's automatic transmission) or DMMU (diesel-mechanical, like a car's manual trans- mission). DMMUs used to be common on secondary routes in Britain 20 years ago; DHMUs specifically, a model called the Budd RDC used to be common on secondary routes around here. I don't know what sort the newer DMUs in Britain are.

Mark Brader "There are three rules for writing the novel. Toronto Unfortunately no one knows what they are." (Email Removed) Maugham

My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Stuart Chapman:
[nq:1]In railway parlance, here at least, "multiple unit" means to connect two or more locomotives or railway power cars together ... as initialisms. Are there others (and do they have the faint odour of the oxymoron that "multiple unit" has)? Roger[/nq]
In the office where I work, we occasionally peedeeyeff documents.

That is, we create PDF (Personal Document Format) files.

Stupot
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Mark Brader:
[nq:1]In the office where I work, we occasionally peedeeyeff documents. That is, we create PDF (Personal Document Format) files.[/nq]
P is for Portable, if you mean the format used by Acrobat.
Mark Brader "(It) was the kind of town where they spell Toronto trouble TRUBIL, and if you try to correct them, (Email Removed) they kill you." Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid
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