Must I use "too... to do" instead of other things?

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My teacher always uses this example, "The boy's too young to go to school." He syas this means the boy cannot go to school because of his age.

But I don't think like that.

I thought the sentence here just means that if "to go to school" this action is taken by the boy, it may appear that the boy is very young (somehow he doesn't suit this job). And this sentence doesn't show a negative meaning, it just shows a suggestion...

Am I right?

So... I think, if I replace the word "too" by "so" or "quite" etc, the sentence still works. But my teacher said if I wanted to use "so", I must say "The boy's so young that he can't go to school." by using a that clause. When I asked why, he answered, it's a fixed match, no reason...

Could you help me?

Thanx,

LMA.
New Member16
too young does carry negative meaning. (The boy's age is young to the "degree" where he Cannot go to school)

If you want the negative meaning be taken out:

The boy is very young to be going to school. (carries less negative meaning, more of suprise or even admiration)

You can replace too...to V with so... that because they have similar if not the same meaning.

The too...to V is affirmative --> The boy is too young to go to school.

The boy is so young that he can't go to school. --> negative (so as you can see, too...to does carry negative meaning)

Its "fixed" because they can replace each other without having to change the meaning too much.
Full Member440
So, if I say "The boy's too young to go to school" or "The boy's so young that he can't go to school", I just mean "Oh,the boy shouldn't go to school at that age!" But if I say "The boy's quite/very young to go to school"(Why you say to be going to school here?), maybe I want to mean, "Wow, Such a clever boy". Am I right?

And... If I start with "The boy's so young...", must I say "...that he can't go to school" but "...to go to school"?

Thank you

LMA
Is there anyone could help me?
Hi again,

I use "he is so young to be going to school." because I am saying I am suprised that at such a young age, the boy is currently doing the action of attending school. "going to school " is not a present continueous tense, I think it is a gerund? (I am not sure why, but it seems right to use to be going to school in this case).

"The boy is quite/very young to be going to school." (I am using the to be going again Emotion: stick out tongue) does not mean that the boy is clever. The boy may be clever, but it is not what the sentence imply.

The sentence does have a "WOW" factor in there. It can be of suprise, awe, or even amusement depending on the tone of voice or the situation. The sentence can carry an inquisitive voice (you let the boy to go to school at such young age?).

"The boy is so young that he can't go to school." contains different meaning and usage than the "to be going to school". This sentence carries a negative meaning of not. --> The boy's age is "too" young --> illegal, abusive, not logical for the boy to go to school at his age.

The sentence can end without anything added "The boy is so young!" in an exclamation tone of voice.
I got more knowledge, Thank you Emotion: smile
New Member06
Thank you very much, I've really learnt a lot from you, thanks!
Hi,

My teacher always uses this example, "The boy's too young to go to school." He syas this means the boy cannot go to school because of his age.

But I don't think like that.

I thought the sentence here just means that if "to go to school" this action is taken by the boy, it may appear that the boy is very young (somehow he doesn't suit this job). And this sentence doesn't show a negative meaning, it just shows a suggestion...

Am I right?

So... I think, if I replace the word "too" by "so" or "quite" etc, the sentence still works. But my teacher said if I wanted to use "so", I must say "The boy's so young that he can't go to school." by using a that clause. When I asked why, he answered, it's a fixed match, no reason...

The boy's too young to go to school. Broadly speaking. the basic idea is that 'going to school' is a problem. The sentence may be said in a context where he does not go to school. Or it may be said in a context where he does go to school.

The boy's quite young to go to school. Broadly speaking. this just stresses that he is young. It does not mean his age is a problem, and it does not mean that he should not go to school.

Broadly speaking, when you use 'so', there needs to be some kind of consequence indicated in the context.

The boy's so young that (as a consequence) he shouldn't go to school.

The problem with The boy's so young to go to school is that there is no clear consequence stated. It is said, but without any consequence mentioned it just means 'The boy is very young. I'm surprised he goes to school'. But itt does not mean there is a problem.

Clive
Veteran Member69,505
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Broadly speaking, when you use 'so', there needs to be some kind of consequence indicated in the context.
Thank you for this one!!

And...

The problem with The boy's so young to go to school is that there is no clear consequence stated. It is said, but without any consequence mentioned it just means 'The boy is very young. I'm surprised he goes to school'. But itt does not mean there is a problem.
That is, there's no mistake in this sentence, right?

Thank you for your help!!!

LMA
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