I have read here in the forum (but can't find the post) where it was said that we never use

We never use "neither... am," even if I is closer to the verb.

Is it really so?
I undersatnd that it sounds awkward, but is it really wrong?

Neither he nor I am going there.

Full Member334
It's because you're using one verb to apply to both subjects. So you're making two statements: 'I am not going there' (correct) and 'He am not going there' (incorrect). 'Am' cannot go with 'he'. In the sentence 'Neither Tom nor Dan is going there' it's fine because the same verb goes with both nouns ('Tom is not going', 'Dan is not going').

So we have to find a verb that can apply to 'he' and 'I' - obviously you can't use 'is' or 'am' because that would be incorrect ('I is' or 'he am' sounds very wrong). So although it should be singular (like 'Neither Tom nor Dan is going' above) you have to use 'are' because it goes with 'he and I', though not 'he' or 'I' individually like it should.

It's better to compromise on the grammar of number rather than person, I guess!
Junior Member88
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Yes, I undersatnd it. I just wanted to know if it is grammatically wrong. Well, anyway it is not how it should be used.
As I said above, it is grammatically wrong. So is the fudged 'are' solution, but that's the official compromise that's been reached, so although it doesn't fit the rule, it is the correct way of doing it.
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Ok. What about AS WELL AS

He, as well as I, am a great person.

Is it also wrong or not?

PS. By the way, you didn't say openly that it was wrong.
It's wrong. Still putting 'he' with 'am'. You'd find a different way of saying it. 'He's a great person, as am I.' Or 'He, like me, is a great person.'
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oops, I have found this
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When I is one of the two subjects connected by either/or or neither/nor, put it second and follow it with the singular verb am.
Example: Neither she nor I am going to the festival.
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http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/subjectVerbAgree.asp
TicceWhen I is one of the two subjects connected by either/or or neither/nor, put it second and follow it with the singular verb am.
Example: Neither she nor I am going to the festival.
It doesn't seem right to compare or and nor. The word nor isn't the negative of or, it's the negative of and. When you say x nor y, it means "not x and not y". It doesn't mean "not x or not y". When you conjoin subjects with and, you pluralize the verb, so it seems to me that you should also pluralize with nor.
Junior Member77
In fact, it is not nor and or which make a problem here. It is "I am" which makes a confusion.
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