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"No bird soars too high if he soars with his own wings"

What's the meaning of this sentence? It sounds inspiring to me. Thank you in advance!
Regular Member717
One can only fly up as high as they're able to; if others push him/her, s/he might reach levels that are too much for him/her.

(I'm sure others will explain it in a more coherent way)
Veteran Member7,461
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Thank you !

What is its inside meaning or its implication?
This is how I interpret the saying;

If a man has a position of power, authority and wealth, and his position in life is gained not through his own skills and hard work, but say inherited from his father, than he can not be proud of where he is in life. He might not do his job well and he will not have the respect of others.
But if a man has achieved anything in his life through his own hard work and initiative then he will have grown as a person through that process. He will be able to do what he does well because of what he has learnt along the way. He can be proud of what he has accomplished and will have the respect of others.

Does that sound about right ?

Full Member323
RT, what you say in your interpretation is absolutely right in life, but I don't think it agrees with the quote. In fact, the quote sounds very strange to me.

The only thing I can think of is something like: One will only get so far in life if he tries to do everything on his own. But he can achieve far greater things if he lets others help him and guide him along the way. So may be one should get a good mentor to show him the ropes.

I don't know...it doesn't sound very inspiring.
Regular Member558
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
I did a little searching and now I found out that the saying is a quote by William Blake. And I believe there was a poem with the same title. Blake's poems are not the most easily understood. His quote here can be understood in several different ways. But after some comtemplation, now I am tending to agree with RT Emotion: smile

No bird soars too high if he soars with his own wings -- William Blake

Now I think it means....no height is too high if you know how to fly. If a bird that didn't know how to fly was put on top of the Sears tower, it might crash and die. But if it flew to the top on it's own...well obviously he can safely get down. And now it even sounds inspiring.

It's okay to change my mind here, right mods? Emotion: embarrassed
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
Thank you all !Emotion: smile
Anonymous:
I'm pretty sure that this is from one of Blakes longer works: The Marriage of Heaven and Hell.
More accurately, this is from a section referred to as the "Proverbs of
Hell." This little snippet can be found next to proverbs such as "
The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom," " A dead body
revenges not injuries," and "
The most sublime act is to set another before you." Some cite proverbs
like those first two and say that this quote is meant to have a
sinsister connotation, like somthing that a man in power would say to
justify his power (hey I worked hard to get here, so i should be able
to do wahtever I want...) I, however, perfer the explination offered
earlier, that as long as you do your own work and climb your own
mountains, then you belong where you end, and can stand proud at the
peak of your accomplishments.
I'm pretty sure that this is from one of Blake’s longer works: The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. More accurately, this is from a section referred to as the "Proverbs of Hell." This little snippet can be found next to proverbs such as " The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom," " A dead body revenges not injuries," and " The most sublime act is to set another before you." Some cite proverbs like those first two and say that this quote is meant to have a sinister connotation, like something that a man in power would say to justify his power (hey I worked hard to get here, so I should be able to do whatever I want...) I, however, prefer the explanation offered earlier, that as long as you do your own work and climb your own mountains, then you belong where you end, and can stand proud at the peak of your accomplishments.

(Sorry if this turns into a double post, I was looking through the forum and decided to create an account.)
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