StartFragment>
In an English grammar textbook made in Japan, there is the following sentences.

But to me 'no more than' is almost same with 'not more than' and 'no less than' with 'not less than.'

Am I right, so I can use them interchangeablely?

• I have no more than $10,000. =only

• I have no less than $10,000. = as much as

• I have not more than $10,000. = at most

• I have not less than $10,000. = at least
Regular Member621
Hi,

In an English grammar textbook made in Japan, there is the following sentences.

But to me 'no more than' is almost same with 'not more than' and 'no less than' with 'not less than.'

This should be written as But to me, 'no more than' is almost the same as 'not more than', and 'no less than' almost the same as 'not less than.'

Am I right, so I can use them interchangeablely? Generally speaking, there's not much difference.

• I have no more than $10,000. =only OK

• I have no less than $10,000. = as much as OK. And maybe I have more.

• I have not more than $10,000. = at most OK

• I have not less than $10,000. = at least

Best wishes, Clive
Veteran Member67,729
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
Thanks, Clive.
Thanks for the answer.
Another thanks for the sentence correction.
Thanks for all.
Anonymous:
Clive's response is inconsistent. If no less than 10,000=as much as and maybe more,then no more than 10,000 should be =only 10,000 maybe less,whic is the same as not more than. Am I correct?
Oh that's a good point. And I think you are correct. As far as I am concerned, if someone says "I have no more than 100 dollars in my drawer.", then he can have precisely 100 dollars or less than 100 dollars like 1 cent in his drawer. By the way, I personally seldom apply "not more than" in the middle of the sentence. I'd prefer to say "I have no more than" rather than "I have not more than". Why? It just sounds better in tune.
Junior Member91
Hi,

Clive's response is inconsistent. If no less than 10,000=as much as and maybe more, yes

then no more than 10,000 should be =only 10,000 maybe less,which is the same as not more than. Am I correct?

no less than 10,000= as much as and maybe more Yes

no more than 10,000 should be =only 10,000 maybe less Thank you for the response. Yes, you're right in terms of logic. Emotion: smile But be careful in assuming tha people always think logically when they speak.

Let me add to my original comments.

The problem with the two negative phrases above is this.

We normally wouldn't use them, in my opinion. We'd say

eg I have $10,000 or I have over $10,000.

eg I only have $10,000 or I have less than / under $10,000.

When we use 'no less than / no more than', we add a little attitude to what we are saying.

no less than $10,000 - my attitude is 'I've got a lot'

no more than $10,000 - my attitude is 'I haven't got a lot'.

Best wishes, Clive
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
Anonymous:
Many thanks for this helpful write-up it turned out a delight to look at.

Chris Kennedy
Live chat
Registered users can join here