One months notice

This is a discussion thread · 6 replies
Steve:
One months notice
or
One month's notice
How does that work then?
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
John Hall:
[nq:1]One months notice or One month's notice How does that work then?[/nq]
The second is correct. It's equivalent to "notice of one month", i.e. it's a possessive.

John Hall
You can divide people into two categories:
those who divide people into two categories and those who don't
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Joe Fogey:
According to the Guardian stylebook, "use apostrophes in phrases such as in two days' time .. where the time period (two days) modifies a noun Emotion: time, but not in nine months pregnant .. where the time period is adverbial (modifying an adjective such as pregnant..)". Notice in this case is a noun so it would be one month's notice.
Fogey
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
John Briggs:
[nq:1]According to the Guardian stylebook, "use apostrophes in phrases such as in two days' time .. where the time period ... (modifying an adjective such as pregnant..)". Notice in this case is a noun so it would be one month's notice.[/nq]
The advice is certainly correct - but I'm not convinced by the reasoning.
John Briggs
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Matti Lamprhey:
[nq:2]According to the Guardian stylebook, "use apostrophes in phrasessuch as ... is a noun so it would be one month's notice.[/nq]
[nq:1]The advice is certainly correct - but I'm not convinced by thereasoning.[/nq]
It's a possessive-type case expressing the notion "notice OF (time period)".
A simpler test is to ask yourself how you would express it were the period just one month. If you use one month then it's adverbial (no apostrophe); if you add the 's' then it must be one month's .

Matti
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
John Briggs:
[nq:2]The advice is certainly correct - but I'm not convinced by the reasoning.[/nq]
[nq:1]It's a possessive-type case expressing the notion "notice OF (time period)".[/nq]
Yes, I know. But I wonder if that's what they mean by "modifies a noun".
[nq:1]A simpler test is to ask yourself how you would express it were the period just one month. If you use one month then it's adverbial (no apostrophe); if you add the 's' then it must be one month's .[/nq]
I'm not convinced that it really is adverbial, rather than adjectival.
John Briggs
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Matti Lamprhey:
You'd be right not to be convinced it IS adjectival. That's when the apostrophe is required.
Perhaps this is the best way to tie my rule in with the Guardian's: when the period modifies a noun, it's adjectival and represents " OF " possessive in form and requiring the apostrophe; when, on the other hand, the period modifies an adjective, it's adverbial and represents " FOR " not possessive in form and not requiring the apostrophe.
Matti
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Live chat
Registered users can join here