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I know "postpone" means delay an event. However, I can't find a single word that means the opposite i.e. make an event happen earlier than scheduled. Could anyone help? Thanks.

Ricky
Junior Member53
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Ricky06I know "postpone" means delay an event. However, I can't find a single word that means the opposite i.e. make an event happen earlier than scheduled. Could anyone help? Thanks.

Ricky

"Prepone"
Contributing Member1,772
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Hi,

I'd say 'advance'.

Clive
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Thanks, Krish and Clive. However, I can't find the word "prepone" from both Cambridge Advanced and American Heritage Dictionary. Also, is it OK to say "I want to advance the meeting to Feb 20"? Thanks.

Ricky
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Ricky06Thanks, Krish and Clive. However, I can't find the word "prepone" from both Cambridge Advanced and American Heritage Dictionary. Also, is it OK to say "I want to advance the meeting to Feb 20"? Thanks.

Ricky

Try /
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I think "advance" is the word, as explained in Concise Oxford English Dictionary

It means "cause to occur at an earlier date than planned"

Emotion: stick out tongue
Regular Member717
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I agree with Clive. It should be "advance".

Rishonly, "prepone" is Indlish - I used to use it a lot myself, but then I read an article in Readers' Digest which taught me that "prepone" is one of a few words that Indians have created for their own convenience. Emotion: smile.

Cheers!

- Joy

[f]
Contributing Member1,324
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Hi,

is it OK to say "I want to advance the meeting to Feb 20"? Yes, it's perfectly normal.

As regards 'prepone', I read this suggestion as a joke, as a humorous back-formation from 'postpone'. I wouldn't take it seriously. Anyone who said that would be greeted with raised eyebrows and incomprehension.

Best wishes, Clive
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CliveAs regards 'prepone', I read this suggestion as a joke, as a humorous back-formation from 'postpone'. I wouldn't take it seriously. Anyone who said that would be greeted with raised eyebrows and incomprehension.
Believe it or not, Clive, "prepone" is regarded as a bonafide word in India! I'm supposed to be fairly good at English, and I had no idea that "prepone" was incorrect till I read that Readers' Digest article! Emotion: surprise

Regards,

- Joy

[f]
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