Out of Station == out of town

This is a discussion thread · 19 replies
1 2 3
Ayaz Ahmed Khan:
Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in an article published in a magazine.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan,
"This is Linux Country. On a quiet night, you can hear NT reboot."
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Peter Duncanson:
[nq:1]Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find any reference of the phrase in either ... wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in an article published in a magazine.[/nq]
It is not a usage with which I am familiar. However it suggests to me "being away from one's normal place of work".
This relates to the meaning of

station

1.a. A place or position where a person or thing stands or is assigned to stand; a post: a sentry station.
b. An area where a person is assigned to work.
...

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Odysseus:
[nq:1]Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find any reference of the phrase in either ... wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in an article published in a magazine.[/nq]
I would expect "station" to refer to something like a depot or branch office, perhaps in a foreign country or remote territory, rather than the town in which it's located. Is that a possible reading in the contexts where you encountered the phrase?

Odysseus
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
nycram:
[nq:1]Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find any reference of the phrase in either ... wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in an article published in a magazine.[/nq]
Is your friend a diplomat perhaps? I think diplomats "sent to lie abroad" use the word "station" to refer to the place they are posted/stationed at.
Gary
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Ayaz Ahmed Khan:
[nq:2]Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? ... it so used in an article published in a magazine.[/nq]
[nq:1]I would expect "station" to refer to something like a depot or branch office, perhaps in a foreign country or remote territory, rather than the town in which it's located. Is that a possible reading in the contexts where you encountered the phrase?[/nq]
I don't think so. The part of the article in which I recently encountered the use of the phrase `out of station' to mean `out of town' is as follows:
The delivery of ATM/Debit Cards is a slow process. Private banks like MCB and Standard Chartered deliver cards within three to four working days. On the contrary, some banks take a minimum of three weeks. If you loose your card or it stops working and you happen to be out of station, then you cannot apply for a new card. The procedure requires your physical presence at the respective branch! In the true essence of online banking, one should be able to go to any branch and get a replacement card or, better still, request one on the phone.
Before my third semester started, I was writing an application which required the endorsement of all my class-mates in the form of their individual signatures. Since one of the class-mate hadn't come back from his vacation, he said he couldn't sign it because of being out of station.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan,
"This is Linux Country. On a quiet night, you can hear NT reboot."
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Ayaz Ahmed Khan:
[nq:2]Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? ... it so used in an article published in a magazine.[/nq]
[nq:1]It is not a usage with which I am familiar. However it suggests to me "being away from one's normal ... stand; a post: a sentry station. b. An area where a person is assigned to work. ... From: http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=station [/nq]
Yes. But I'm quite sure that the contexts in which I have heard and read the phrase indicated the physical absence of the person from her home-town.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan,
"This is Linux Country. On a quiet night, you can hear NT reboot."
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Peter Duncanson:
[nq:2]It is not a usage with which I am familiar. ... a person is assigned to work. ... From: [/nq]
[nq:1]Yes. But I'm quite sure that the contexts in which I have heard and read the phrase indicated the physical absence of the person from her home-town.[/nq]
It seems likely that some people have widened the usage of the phrase. Perhaps "out of station" sounds more formal and grander than "away from home".

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
meirman:
[nq:2]It is not a usage with which I am familiar. ... a person is assigned to work. ... From: [/nq]
[nq:1]Yes. But I'm quite sure that the contexts in which I have heard and read the phrase indicated the physical absence of the person from her home-town.[/nq]
Maybe she was stationed in her home-town, so she left her station and town at the same time.
The military is always stationing people somewhere, and the diplomatic corps. And I think the CIA. Don't they call the local boss the station chief?
s/ meirman If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
Born west of Pittsburgh Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis, 7 years
Chicago, 6 years
Brooklyn NY 12 years
Baltimore 20 years
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
meirman:
[nq:2]I would expect "station" to refer to something like a ... possible reading in the contexts where you encountered the phrase?[/nq]
[nq:1]I don't think so. The part of the article in which I recently encountered the use of the phrase `out ... be able to go to any branch and get a replacement card or, better still, request one on the phone.[/nq]
I just requested one on the phone. I think they told me 5-7 business days, and it came in about 7 calendar days. Visa.

The guy is a complainer, therefore probably a crank, therefore he thinks he can use words like no one else does. That's my conclusion and I'm sticking to it.
[nq:1]Before my third semester started, I was writing an application which required the endorsement of all my class-mates in the ... the class-mate hadn't come back from his vacation, he said he couldn't sign it because of being out of station.[/nq]
I wish you guys would say where you're posting from, like I do.

s/ meirman If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
Born west of Pittsburgh Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis, 7 years
Chicago, 6 years
Brooklyn NY 12 years
now in Baltimore 20 years
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Show more
Live chat
Registered users can join here