Participle tenses

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If we want to use a participle phrase, how do we express that something happened over a period in the past?

Having sung to the crowd, I felt I deserved a cold glass of beer.

Though there is no such tense as the below, I feel it best conveys my intent. There's a past perfect continuous tense, so why is there not a past perfect continuous participle? Your comments?

Having been singing to the crowd, I felt I deserved a cold glass of beer.

Cheers,

Eng
Senior Member2,871
English 1b3Having sung to the crowd, I felt I deserved a cold glass of beer.

Having been singing to the crowd, I felt I deserved a cold glass of beer.
Both of your examples perform the job you propose.

These are perfect tenses. Some people don't think they deserve that name, but it seems to have stuck!
English 1b3Though there is no such tense as the below,
Not true! It's also a continuous tense, which always requires some form of "to be."

Should we call it a "to be tense"?
Veteran Member20,911
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AvangiBoth of your examples perform the job you propose. These are perfect tenses. Some people don't think they deserve that name, but it seems to have stuck!
Are you sure my second version works though? I can't seem to find examples of the past pefrect continuous participle online, but when I said it quite naturally today, I doubted google, not me for a change. Hence, I'm here, utterly confused.
English 1b3I can't seem to find examples of the past pefrect continuous participle online
We don't necessarily name verb forms for tenses.
There are many tenses, and their proper formations all require the use of from one to three specific verb forms. Some use participles, and some don't.

I'm only able to bring to mind the present participle and the past participle. Perhaps someday we'll have more. Emotion: thinking

Best regards, - A.

Edit. What encouraged you to look for a unique participal for each possible tense?

The simple present tense doesn't use the present participle.

It's used in the present continuous and in the past continuous, among others.

The simple past tense doesn't necessarily use the past participle.

It's used in passive voice structures, along with the verb "to be."

It's also used in the perfect tenses.

Edit. Edit. I should have mentioned that neither of your introductory phrases exhibits a "tense" in the sense of a finite verb. They're both "present participial phrases." Right?

I guess modern grammar calls them clauses, nevertheless.

Having sung to the crowd, I felt I deserved a cold glass of beer.
Having been singing to the crowd, I felt I deserved a cold glass of beer.
.

Please excuse me. I see that you mentioned that fact at the very beginning of your first post. Sorry! Emotion: embarrassed

My understanding is that they're called "participial phrases" because they begin with one.

I know that we have perfect infinitives: To have sung to the crowd was good reason to deserve a beer.

I guess perfect continuous infinitives follow: To have been singing to the crowd was good reason to deserve a beer.

But I haven't heard the term "perfect continuous gerund" or " - participle."

My having been singing to the crowd was good reason etc. .Now it's subject of the sentence (like the infinitives), so we call it a gerund.

But is the gerund "having," or "singing"?

I'm afraid I've made a mess of this.

- A.
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My logic and gut told me my sentence was correct. I was just trying to find proof of this; I don't know why exactly, come to think of it.

Here is my logic, if you could call it that:

The verb to be can be followed by either the past participle, creating the passive voice, or the present paritciple, creating the continuous tense.

When the verb to be is preceded by the verb have, which is used to create the perfect tense, the verb to be is placed in its past participle form, been.

Now, the past perfect continuous exists (have been walking), so you would expect there to be a participle equivalent, right? But I cannot, for the life of me, find it on the net. Each site talks of the present participle phrase, the past participle phrase, the perfect participle phrase, and each of these in both active and passive voice:

Walking along the path, I noticed...

Destroyed by the quake, the city...

Having walked along the path, I noticed...

Having been destroyed by the quake, the city...

Having been + present continuous... ???

I'm stubborn. I won't be convinced 'til i see proof of it Emotion: smile
If you can't find it, I probably can't either.

I know the usage is correct (as do you.) CJ will come up with the nomenclature, and then you'll be able to find it on the net. Emotion: nodding

There are plenty of examples of the "perfect continuous infinitive."

The perfect continuous infinitive:

to have been + present participle

Examples:

to have been crying
to have been waiting
to have been painting
  • The woman seemed to have been crying.
  • You must have been waiting for hours!
  • He pretended to have been painting all day.


http://www.edufind.com/english/grammar/inf6.cfm
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The sites that discuss participle phrases seem to try and cover all types, so I can't understand why they would miss this one out... Perhaps there is a reason for this.

We all know the sentence is correct, but it just frustrates me that we can't proove what we already know. I will keep questing and will certainly keep your inquisitive mind in the loop.
And while I continue my quest for sanity, I would like for you to cast your eyes at this, if you would: http://www.englishforums.com/English/TensesConditionals/pnmrb/post.htm

Your opinion and presence is appreciated Emotion: smile

Cheers,

Eng
They're all familiar.

I'm the worst person to ask about the fine points of conditionals!

BTW, I believe the expression is "to cast one's eyes on etc."

Oh is there not one maiden here
Whose homely face and bad complexion,
Have caused all hope to disappear
Of ever winning man's affection

To such an one if such there be
I swear by heavens arch above you
if you will cast your eyes on me
However plain you’ll be I'll love you,
How ever plain you’ll be. - Sir William Schwenck Gilbert

(my favorite example of eye-casting) Emotion: it wasnt me

If you're fond of fishing, you might impale one of your eyeballs on a hook and send it toward where the action seems to be.

But save the other one to dress the fish you'll surely catch. Emotion: happy

I'll try to think about your other post later. Emotion: nodding
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