Past participle of stride - strode or stridden?

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David Picton:
According to most dictionaries, the past participle of stride is definitely stridden: I strode, I had stridden. An exception is the OED which also lists strode as a 'colloquial' past participle. What interests me is the fact that the colloquial form now seems to be taking over.
I did a web search for "has>have>had strode" vs "has>have>had stridden". For a worldwide search there were 799 hits for strode vs.
516 for stridden. The dominance of 'strode' is even greater in theUK: 174 hits for strode, only 28 for stridden!
The question which I want to ask is: which form sounds right to your 'ear'? Do you think that dictionaries should be revised to reflect the actual status quo, or should they continue to list only 'stridden' on the basis of logical consistency (ride/rode/ridden, drive/drove/driven etc.)
(What I expect to happen is that the OED compilers will look for evidence of use, then quietly drop the 'colloquial' tag on strode as the past participle. Then smaller dictionaries will follow suit over time.)
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Adrian Bailey:
[nq:1]According to most dictionaries, the past participle of stride is definitely stridden: I strode, I had stridden. An exception is ... for stridden. The dominance of 'strode' is even greater in the UK: 174 hits for strode, only 28 for stridden![/nq]
A lot of the striding in Britain is done in areas where it's common to use the preterite in place of the past participle for all verbs, ie. Scotland and the far north of England.
[nq:1]The question which I want to ask is: which form sounds right to your 'ear'?[/nq]
It difficult to say with such a relatively rare verb. Both sound okay, I think, though "stridden" makes me think of "striven".

Do you think that dictionaries should be revised to reflect
[nq:1]the actual status quo, or should they continue to list only 'stridden' on the basis of logical consistency (ride/rode/ridden, drive/drove/driven etc.)[/nq]
The dictionaries will change their entries, of course. It might take a decade or two, though...
Adrian
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rewboss:
"David Picton" (Email Removed) schrieb im Newsbeitrag
[nq:1]According to most dictionaries, the past participle of stride is definitely stridden: I strode, I had stridden. An exception is ... then quietly drop the 'colloquial' tag on strode as the past participle. Then smaller dictionaries will follow suit over time.)[/nq]
I'm thinking that the perfect aspect of "stride" isn't often used not that it can't be used, but that there is seldom any cause for it.

The perfect aspect usually implies some completed action the result of which is still present and can be demonstrated in some way. For example, if you say "John has come to see you," you mean that John is still there, waiting for you to greet him. If you say, "John came to see you," you don't imply that at all, and in all likelihood John has given up waiting for you and gone back home.
Although it is possible to say, "John has stridden all this way to see you," when would you normally need to? It would imply, in addition to the fact that John is still there, that he is also exhausted from all that striding. He probably came close to a hamstring injury.
Another possible reason to use the present perfect would be to imply that someone has acquired knowledge or experience: "He has been to London" implies that he knows the city, or knows how to get there, or at least can tell you a bit about the place from his own experience. Again, you could possibly use "stridden" in that sense "He has stridden before, which is why he's reluctant to try again" but it's not going to form part of your daily routine.
Not that you'd never use it for example, you might be sitting in a car in a safari park and talking on a mobile phone to a friend: "I can see some rhinos... they've stridden across the road behind me...". The past perfect might be a little more common: "She had just stridden over to the Jones's house when she heard the gunshot."
So... what's the point of this ramble?
Two things: First, since few people ever have cause to use "stride" in the perfect aspect, few people know that the past participle is "stridden" (it follows the same pattern as "ride" "rode" "have ridden"). Your Googling revealed this: there must be millions of English languages websites out there, but only a few hundred have "stride" in the perfect, and most got it wrong.
Second, since you're seldom going to have to use it yourself (I presume you must be having to use it now, since you ask, but you may never need to again), it's probably not worth panicking about.
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Arfur Million:
[nq:1]Do you think that dictionaries should be revised to reflect[/nq]
[nq:2]the actual status quo, or should they continue to list only 'stridden' on the basis of logical consistency (ride/rode/ridden, drive/drove/driven etc.)[/nq]
[nq:1]The dictionaries will change their entries, of course. It might take a decade or two, though... Adrian[/nq]
NewSOED gives "strode" as a colloquial alternative to "stridden".

Arfur
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Robert Lieblich:
[nq:1][/nq]
[nq:2]Do you think that dictionaries should be revised to reflect ... of course. It might take a decade or two, though...[/nq]
[nq:1]NewSOED gives "strode" as a colloquial alternative to "stridden".[/nq]
I checked three mainstream online American dictionaries (M-W, AHD4, Encarta) and none listed "strode" as an alternative to "stridden." I have no recollection of ever using a past participle for "stride." I use "stride" mostly as a noun, and the verb in the simple present and past.
Given the way the language develops, I'd wager that "strode" will break into the American dictionaries as past participle in another few decades.

Bob Lieblich
Striding fourth (formerly third, but fading)
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David Picton:
[nq:2]According to most dictionaries, the past participle of stride is ... that the colloquial form now seems to be taking over.[/nq]
(snip)
[nq:1]I'm thinking that the perfect aspect of "stride" isn't often used not that it can't be used, but that there is seldom any cause for it.[/nq]
But sometimes there is. I saw a Usenet post in which J.K. Rowling had a slap on the wrist for:
Dumbledore had strode alone into the Forest to rescue her from the centaurs ...
That's what I would have written if I hadn't consulted the dictionary! I can imagine needing to use the correct form in an academic paper - something like 'the range through which the random number generator has stridden'.
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Professor Redwine:
[nq:1]But sometimes there is. I saw a Usenet post in which J.K. Rowling had a slap on the wrist for: Dumbledore had strode alone into the Forest to rescue her from the centaurs ...[/nq]
I think it's a bit harsh to slap JKR anywhere for that. Authors, particularly when in the flow of narrative, often make such errors. Less obvious errors, such as this, are then very hard to find when reading one's own work. The editor(s) who let this pass, however, deserve more than just a slap on the wrist. As both a writer and an editor I consider it to be understandable writing but shoddy editing.

Redwine
Hamburg
(previously: Berlin, Northants, Derbs, Staffs, NSW, Tasmania, Melbourne, rural Victoria, in that and many other orders)
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Daniel James:
[nq:1]I'm thinking that the perfect aspect of "stride" isn't often used not that it can't be used, but that there is seldom any cause for it.[/nq]
I've stridden these moors by night and day for nigh on forty years, and there isn't a bog or a tussock that I don't know like the back of my hand.
(For some reason my fingers want to type that in a strong mummerset accent: "I've strode these moor for nigh-on forty year, and there bain't a bog nor tussock as I ..." you get the idea.)

Of course, past participles can be and are also used adjectivally - the West Highland Way is a much stridden track, for example. I don't see "strode" being used there.
Cheers,
Daniel.
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Steve Hayes:
[nq:1]According to most dictionaries, the past participle of stride is definitely stridden: I strode, I had stridden. An exception is ... a 'colloquial' past participle. What interests me is the fact that the colloquial form now seems to be taking over.[/nq]
I'd have to look up "past tense" and "past participle" in a dictionary, for which I need to wait for the sun to come up, and by then the cheap phone rate will be over at this time of year.
But something similar has struck me - the displacement of "proved" by "proven".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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