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Anonymous:
We have a question about the use of "Please be advised" at the start of a sentence. Should "Please be advised" always be followed by a "that"? For example, "Please be advised that your payment is late." If "Please be advised is used without a "that", must it always be followed by a comma? For example, "Please be advised, your payment is late." Or, can it be used without a comma? For example, "Please be advised your payment is late."

Thanks very much for your assistance.
AnonymousWe have a question about the use of "Please be advised" at the start of a sentence. Should "Please be advised" always be followed by a "that"? For example, "Please be advised that your payment is late." If "Please be advised is used without a "that", must it always be followed by a comma? For example, "Please be advised, your payment is late." Or, can it be used without a comma? For example, "Please be advised your payment is late."

Please be advised that ...

Please be advised ... (no comma needed)

I've seen Please be advised that ... used.

If that is dropped, there should no comma after advised. However, I've never seen 'advised' used without 'that'.

Veteran Member8,069
Anonymous:
How about this: Do not use the phrase "Please be advised." Rather state: Mr./Mrs. Smith your payment is late.

I feel that use of this term is superfluous and has no place in either written or spoken word.
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I agree with Anon enthusiastically. It is one of several turgid and useless set phrases that need to be expunged from good Business English. Others are 'this is to bring to your attention', 'it has come to our attention', etc.

All business letters have purposes; there is no point in beginning one by telling the reader that the letter has a purpose.
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Veteran Member88,778
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AnonymousI feel that use of this term is superfluous and has no place ...
The phrase is perfectly appropriate when the writer wants to show that he is in the superior position of authority concerning the subject matter of the sentence. It is very official sounding, and is used for that very reason -- as encouragement to the reader that he must pay attention and obey whatever follows in the message. The word advise can connote warning, i.e., a sort of threat.

Oops! Mr. M. was answering at the same time. It appears it will be instructive (in some way or another, I suppose) to compare our answers! Emotion: big smile

CJ
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It has been my experience, Jim, that ESL learners of business English tend to latch onto these sorts of fixed phrases all too readily and use them even more assiduously than the worst native business writers do. Beyond that, I have always felt that BizEnglish is poor English, in that it too often gets in the way of communication. So much of it is verbal diarrhea.

Another student asked me recently: "And if I am a client of a party and I write this sentence would it be right or wrong-- 'Your prompt response would be highly appreciated' ".

My response: "Yes, that is OK in a strictly business setting and you the recipient of services, but still this kind of BizEnglish is being overtaken by a simpler, more personal approach: 'Please let me know as soon as possible' ".
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Anonymous:
"Be advise" should not be used in verbal or written communication. It is unnessary and superflous.

Say what you have to say and be done with it.

"Mr. Smith please not that you account is over due."
Some people prefer hamburgers and some perfer better and finer things in life, like say "Filet Mignon". It's not a sin, just different taste for different folks.

But, if one is interested in acquiring some finesse with words, "be advised" is a gentler, or more tactful ways, if you will, of saying "I am here to tell you..." which is rather blunt and brute.
Senior Member3,816
Anonymous:
It is widely used in the military.

For example: "All units be advised; there is a road block two kilometres away"

Or simply: "Be advised; there is ..."
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