Possessive of singular noun that ends in S?

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Anonymous:
what's the rule in english grammar for forming the possessive of a singular noun that ends in s?
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AnonymousThe rule in the English language to make a singular noun possesive is add apostrophe s. No exeptions. Ever!
I don't usually both participating in threads this old, but this is not correct.

The "old classics" like Jesus, Socrates, etc, who end in S often do NOT get the 's.

And upon re-reading this thread, it's not "dumbing down" to reflect change in styles. It's a reflection of changes in styles!

I would also suggest that any rule that says "no exceptions, ever" is almost always going to be incorrect. English is a language replete with exceptions.
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Please don't put a new, unrelated question on the end of a post that is three years old.

For the most part, it will still take 's.

Gladys's ring, etc.

There are exceptions for Jesus and a few other ancients.
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Grammar GeekGladys's ring, etc.

I dare object... I think it is Bladys' ring... Emotion: smile

What about that?
New Member36
If Blady were plural ,Bladys, using 's as you used Bladys' ring... would be ok.
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Anonymouswhat's the rule in english grammar for forming the possessive of a singular noun that ends in s?

When I was in high school, I was taught to add only an apostrophe and not an "s". Only later did I discover that both forms are possible.

Read:

" To make the possessive form of a SINGULAR noun that ends in -s, some style guides say to add just an apostrophe ('); others say you should add an apostrophe and s ('s). Some say that either way is correct.
The best answer: when dealing with SINGULAR nouns, find out what the expectations are wherever you're writing and go by that. In most cases, you can just ask your teacher what he or she prefers. (...)
So, to give a couple of examples...
For "nucleus" (singular noun ending in -s), write is as:
nucleus' or nucleus's
depending on the rules where you're writing. "


on [url=http://owl.english.purdue.edu/purdueowlnews/20060129 /] this page[/url], second issue.

And, from the [url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv57.shtml ] BBC website[/url]:

" However, if the singular noun ends in ‘s’ as in your example, Everson, you can either just add an apostrophe (’) or apostrophe 's' (’s):
- 'All of Dickens’ novels have now been adapted for television.'
- 'All of Dickens’s novels have now been adapted for television.'
Note that these spellings are pronounced differently. If you simply add an apostrophe, the pronunciation does not change, but if you add apostrophe 's' (’s), the possessive is pronounced /iz/.
With singular nouns ending in double 's' (...) I think it is more normal to add apostrophe 's' (’s) because the spelling with apostrophe s then indicates the pronunciation required:
- 'The boss’s secretary resigned.'
- 'The princess’s diamonds were worth two million pounds.' "
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TanitTo make the possessive form of a SINGULAR noun that ends in -s, some style guides say to add just an apostrophe ('); others say you should add an apostrophe and s ('s). Some say that either way is correct.
I find older grammar books, for example "A Modern English Grammar" (Oxford Unifersity Press 1965, 21 Shillings), goes with "Dickens's novel" form whereas later grammar books say either is acceptable, which points towards a dumbing down of standards over the last 40 years.
Regular Member532
Anonymous:
[disregard my previous note]

im confident that for:
singular nouns ending in s, add an apostrophe
jesus --> jesus' robe
singular nouns not ending in s, add an apostrophe s
john --> john's coffee
plural nouns ending in s, add an apostrophe
teachers --> teachers' curriculum
plural nouns not ending in s, add an apostrophe and s
children --> children's toys
nuclei --> nuclei's chromosomes

like previous responders have indicated, these rules have been "dumbed down" so now i guess it also acceptable to add an additional s where normally you would added only an apostrophe for SINGULAR nouns but not plural nouns:
singular nouns ending in s, add an apostrophe AND s
jesus --> jesus's robe
plural nouns ending in s, still add an apostrophe ONLY
teachers --> teachers' curriculum
princesses --> princesses'

the extra s looks silly to me though.

hope that helps
Anonymous:
The rule in the English language to make a singular noun possesive is add apostrophe s. No exeptions. Ever! Emotion: smile
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