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How would you read out the following numbers?

2,684 ft? Would you say 26 hundred and 84 or two thousand six hundred and eighty four feet?
How about any other four digit number?
I believe the four digit numbers with only the two first digits significant are read by first reading the first two digits followed by hundred e.g. 8,400 is read 84-hundred. But how do you read four digit numbers with three or four significant digits e.g. 5,280 or 7,435?

How about 1,415,926,535? Would you read it as 1 billion, 4 hundred and 15 million, 9 hundred and 26 thousand, 5 hundred and 35? My English teacher (he’s English) taught that the British pronounce these and's, but Americans do not. I’m, however, not convinced since I have heard Americans say things like: the year 2-thousand and 9.

Finally, the decimal numbers? Would you read the number 0.8320671 as (oh/naught) point eight three two oh/zero six seven one? My English teacher says the digits after the decimal point are read separately, but once again I’m not completely convinced.
New Member09
Pronounce like telephone numbers. Group up n the stretch the last number in that group, since speakers know the context.
Full Member384
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Anonymous:
Hi, let me help you, I am Canadian. First of all, there is the correct way to say numbers, and the everyday/slang way. The proper way is "and" means a decimal. You NEVER use "and" unless denoting a decimal.

How about 1,415,926,535?

Properly it is read:

One billion, four hundred fifteen million, nine hundred twenty-six thousand, five hundred thirty-five.

2,684 ft = Two thousand, six hundred eighty-four

2, 684.2 = Two thousand, six hundred, eighty-four, and two-tenths.

the "hundred" stuff is lazy and it is slang, however very commonly used. Most English speaking don't even realize this.

2400 = should be read as, Two thousand, four hundred.

But they will just say, "Twenty-four hundred" instead. There is nothing for thousands, millions, etc. because the "hundreds" is just slang anyway.

Adding in "and" is not proper, but most people use it because the proper way is hard and many forgot about it upon leaving school. Most Canadians/ Americans throw in "and" whenever they please. They just don't know how to count properly and there will be no rules or consitancy in what they are saying.

More practice:

1001.00 = One thousand, one.

1001.10 = One thousand one and one tenth .

1001.01 = One thousand one, and one hundreths.

1001.001 = One thousand, one, and one thousandths.

The number 0.28 is read as twenty-eight hundredths and is the same as 28

100
.

The number 0.56 is read as fifty-six hundredths and is the same as 56

100
.


Here is a web-site to help you - good luck

http://www.coolmath.com/prealgebra/02-decimals/02-decimals-reading-01.htm
Hi,

To the last poster, all I can say is that I'm a Canadian too, and there are so many statements I disagree with in your post that I don't even know where to start commenting.

So, I won't.

Instead, I'll focus on the original query.

How would you read out the following numbers?

2,684 ft? Would you say 26 hundred and 84 or two thousand six hundred and eighty four feet?
How about any other four digit number?
I believe the four digit numbers with only the two first digits significant are read by first reading the first two digits followed by hundred e.g. 8,400 is read 84-hundred. Yes. But less informally, say eight thousand, four hundred.

lBut how do you read four digit numbers with three or four significant digits e.g. 5,280 or 7,435?

Two thousand, six hundred and eighty-four feet.

Five thousand,two hundred and eighty.

Seven thousand, four hundred and thirty-five.

How about 1,415,926,535? Would you read it as 1 billion, 4 hundred and 15 million, 9 hundred and 26 thousand, 5 hundred and 35? Yes, I'd say it this way. My English teacher (he’s English) taught that the British pronounce these and's, but Americans do not. I’m, however, not convinced since I have heard Americans say things like: the year 2-thousand and 9.

Note that, in practice, such large numbers are not commonly read aloud.
If they are, we often simply say each individual digit separately, as we would if we were telling someone our phone number.

Finally, the decimal numbers? Would you read the number 0.8320671 as (oh/naught) point eight three two oh/zero six seven one? My English teacher says the digits after the decimal point are read separately, but once again I’m not completely convinced. I agree with him.

zero point eight three . . .

We often just say

point eight three . .

'Naught' is uncommon in Canada.

In certain contexts, 'oh' is often said instead of zero.

Best wishes, Clive
Veteran Member69,425
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I wrote the anonymous reply before signing up. It is correct, I have my Bachelor of Education.

This is how it is taught in our school system.

Please click on the link that I posted - it states clearly about using "and" as a decimal.
New Member20
Printable worksheets with answers to help you practice:

http://www.mathsisfun.com/worksheets/index.php
Hi Charlene,

Nice to meet you.Emotion: smile

Ratherthan argue qualifications, let me just note that many people on this site have degrees, and that some have advanced degrees. But I think it's better for us all to offer our opinions and arguments, and to let them stand on their merits.

I looked at the last site you mentioned. It seems oriented to small children, and to be trying to help them to understand decimal numbers by relating them to fractions.

Let's focus on decimals. Consider a number written as 3.597632

I'd say this aloud as three point five nine seven six three two.

How would you say this aloud, to another adult?

Best wishes, Clive
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
The web-site was not to practice mathematics, but English. Under the decimals link, it is the numbers with the English translation. I'm sure the person can add and subtract.

I won't comment on your other comments as they are derogatory, and I think you are embarracing yourself enough at this moment by trying to make fun of me.
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