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A keeper of an apartment has reasons to believe that a thief is lurking in his apartment. He decides to invite a detective over to his apartment for investigation. The detective one day is looking fir evidence in the apartment when he hears a knock. A man walked in and said "oops I thought it was my apartment, sorry" and started to leave. The detective asked him one question and knew he was the thief. What was the question and how did the detective know he was the thief?
 
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The most common lies in the English Language: It wasn't me. I'm fine. Gee, you haven’t changed a bit. The cheque is in the mail. I never got the message. We service what we sell. She is only a friend. Your baby looks so beautiful. That looks so good on you. One size fits all. I'll start my diet on Monday. Thank you, dinner was so delicious. I need 5 minutes of your time. I never said that. Give me your number and the doctor will call you right back. Money cheerfully refunded. This offer limited to the first 100 people who call in. Leave your CV and we’ll keep it on file. This hurts me more than it hurts you. Your table will be ready in a few minutes. Open wide, it won’t hurt a bit. Let’s have lunch sometime. It’s not the money, it’s the principle. I wasn’t feeling well. I didn’t want to hurt your feelings. I was just kidding. I was only trying to help. If you can think of any more, feel free to add them here.
 
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its been around for millions of years but is never a month old. what am i? four letters
 
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An Amazing Love Story Once there was a boy who loved a girl very much. The girl’s father however didn’t like the boy. The boy wanted to write a love letter to the girl but he was sure that the girl’s father would read it first. Nevertheless, he wrote this letter : “This great love I said I have for you Is gone and I find my dislikes for you Increases everyday, when I see you I don’t even like the way you look, The one thing I want to do is to Look another way. I never wanted to Marry. Our last conversation Was very dull and in no way Has made me anxious to see you again. You think only of yourself. If we were married I know that I’d find Life very difficult nor would I find Pleasure in living with you. I’ve heart To give, but it is not a heart I want to give you, No one is more Demanding or selfish than you and less Able to care for me and helpful to me I sincerely want you to understand that I speak the truth. You will do me a favor If you consider to put this to an end. Do not cry To answer this. Your letters are full of Things that do not interest me. True concern for me. Goodbye! Believe me I don’t care for you. Please don’t think I am still yours” The girl’s father read the letter, was very happy and gave it to his daughter. His daughter read the letter and was very happy too. “CAN YOU ANSWER WHY WAS SHE HAPPY” Regards ...
 
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what is the answer to the riddle: though his eye may be wild it sees much that's unseen an old broom perhaps, but he always sweeps clean?
 
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Everyone on Earth has one Everyone uses it It is often associated with money
By Anonymous  
 
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Warning: Only start this if you want something to become an obsession and take over your life! Well, an afternoon anyway. I'm stuck on the question with 'don't touch pink' so if anyone beats that please give me a hint. [link]
 
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Einstein wrote this riddle last century and said that 98% of the world’s population would not be able to solve it. • There are 5 houses that are each a different colour. • There is a person of a different nationality in each house. • The 5 owners drink a certain drink. They each smoke a certain brand of cigarettes and also have a certain pet. No owner has the same pet, smokes the same brand of cigarettes nor drinks the same drink. • The question is. “Who has the fish?” CLUES 1. The British man lives in the red house. 2. The Swedish man has a dog for a pet. 3. The Danish man drinks tea. 4. The green house is to the left of the white house. 5. The owner of the green house drinks coffee. 6. The person that smokes Pall Mall has a bird. 7. The owner of the yellow house smokes Dunhill. 8. The person that lives in the middle house drinks milk. 9. The Norwegian lives in the first house. 10. The person that smokes Blend, lives next to the one that has a cat. 11. The person that has a horse lives next to the one that smokes Dunhill. 12. The one that smokes Bluemaster drinks beer. 13. The German smokes Prince. 14. The Norwegian lives next to a blue house. 15. The person that smokes Blend, has a neighbour that drinks water. GOOD LUCK!!! ...
 
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Would anyone know the shortest sentence in the English language that has every letter of the alphabet?
 
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Three ants were walking in a straight line (one behind the other). The first ant said "There are two ants behind me". The second ant said "There is one ant in front of me and one ant behind me". The third ant said "There are two ants in front of me and two ants behind me". Why did the third ant say that?
 
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Poem by an African When I born, I Black, When I grow up, I Black, When I go in Sun, I Black, When I scared, I Black, When I sick, I Black, And when I die, I still black.. And you White fella, When you born, you Pink, When you grow up, you White, When you go in Sun, you Red, When you cold, you Blue, When you scared, you Yellow, When you sick, you Green, And when you die, you Gray.. And you calling me Colored? ps: I certainly do not mean this from a racist perspective, just thought it was funny. Don't get me wrong, please. ...
 
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Hi everybody Riddles are a kind of entertainment for our brain. Some of them are very easy and the others are complex and need more intelligence and intention to understand the meaning. In my opinion, they can also be used to enrich our knowledge and vocabulary as regards training languages. Thereby, to stimulate your brain I propose these easy riddles: We put me on the table. We cut me, but we don't eat me. whom am I ? I'm as big as the Eiffel Tower and lighter too. Whom am I ?) You can have me but cannot hold me; Gain me and quickly lose me. If treated with care I can be great, And if betrayed I will break. What am I? Almost everyone needs it, asks for it, gives it, but almost nobody takes it. What is it? What never asks questions but must always be answered?..... Good Luck ...
 
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Which is the strongest day of a week?
 
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I have recently reached to the shortest sentence with all letters;lazy,&quick tv-show frog jumped in a bx.(bx. is an approved abbreviation of box).Only a,i,o,and u are repeated,and all are vowels!Thank God!and thank you!
 
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A son might ask this-Father, is it an all act or is this really you? Who are you?
By Anonymous  
 
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There are 9 balls and all off them are identical. The owner of the balls tells that one of them is defected. You are given with a weighing machine. You have got three chances to find the defected ball using the weighing machine. Find the defected ball?
 
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There is no egg in eggplant or ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple... Is cheese the plural of choose? If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? In what language do people recite at a play, and play at a recital? Ship by truck, and send cargo by ship? Have noses that run and feet that smell? Park on driveways and drive on parkways? Sweetmeats are candies, while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square, and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig. And why is it that writers write, but fingers don't fing, grocers don't groce, and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So, one moose, 2 meese? One index, two indices? How can the weather be hot as hell one day and cold as hell another? When a house burns up, it burns down. You fill in a form by filling it out, and an alarm clock goes off by going on. When the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out, they are invisible. And why, when I wind up my watch, I start it, but when I wind up this essay, I end it? .English muffins were not invented in England or French fries in France. How can 'slim chance and a fat chance' be the same, while ' wise man and a wise guy' are opposites? Now i know why i failed in english. It's not my fault but the silly language doesn't quite know whether it's coming or going yours;...
 
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ACETYL­SERYL­TYROSYL­SERYL­ISO­LEUCYL­THREONYL­SERYL­PROLYL­SERYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­VALYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­LEUCYL­SERYL­SERYL­VALYL­TRYPTOPHYL­ALANYL­ASPARTYL­PROLYL­ISOLEUCYL­GLUTAMYL­LEUCYL­LEUCYL­ASPARAGINYL­VALYL­CYSTEINYL­THREONYL­SERYL­SERYL­LEUCYL­GLYCYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­GLUTAMINYL­THREONYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­ALANYL­ARGINYL­THREONYL­THREONYL­GLUTAMINYL­VALYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­SERYL­GLUTAMINYL­VALYL­TRYPTOPHYL­LYSYL­PROLYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­PROLYL­GLUTAMINYL­SERYL­THREONYL­VALYL­ARGINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­PROLYL­GLYCYL­ASPARTYL­VALYL­TYROSYL­LYSYL­VALYL­TYROSYL­ARGINYL­TYROSYL­ASPARAGINYL­ALANYL­VALYL­LEUCYL­ASPARTYL­PROLYL­LEUCYL­ISOLEUCYL­THREONYL­ALANYL­LEUCYL­LEUCYL­GLYCYL­THREONYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­ASPARTYL­THREONYL­ARGINYL­ASPARAGINYL­ARGINYL­ISOLEUCYL­ISOLEUCYL­GLUTAMYL­VALYL­GLUTAMYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­SERYL­PROLYL­THREONYL­THREONYL­ALANYL­GLUTAMYL­THREONYL­LEUCYL­ASPARTYL­ALANYL­THREONYL­ARGINYL­ARGINYL­VALYL­ASPARTYL­ASPARTYL­ALANYL­THREONYL­VALYL­ALANYL­ISOLEUCYL­ARGINYL­SERYL­ALANYL­ASPARAGINYL­ISOLEUCYL­ASPARAGINYL­LEUCYL­VALYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMYL­LEUCYL­VALYL­ARGINYL­GLYCYL­THREONYL­GLYCYL­LEUCYL­TYR Definition : Tobacco Mosaic Virus, Dahlemense Strain go to [link] to look at all the longest words Oh yea i forgot to tell you its 1185 letters long!
 
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Hi here is an English sentence has all the letters from a-z it's The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog . that has been used to test typewriters and computer keypoards 'coz it's nicely coherent and short
 
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One time in a while gets closer when far it gets older and older till it stops altogether this is part of me part of you part of everyone One word One number One time Tell me this when it happens and ill love you forever You know this well You have it safe I know bout you
By Anonymous  
 
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U saw a shirt for 97.00, and since you don't have enough cash, you borrowed 50.00 from your mother and 50.00 from your father which will give you 100.11. Since the shirt is 97.00 that will give you 3.00 change which you give 1.00 to your mother and 1.00 to your father and keep the other 1.00 to yourself. You now owe your mother and father both 49.00 which means 49.00 + 49.00 = 98.00 plus the 1.00 you kept for yourself gives you a total of 99.00. Where's the missing 1.00?
 
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Other three riddles to solve: 1.Some months have 30 days, some have 31; how many months have 28 days? 2.I have rivers without water, Forests without trees, Mountains without rocks Towns without houses. What am I? 3.A group of campers have been on vacation so long, that they've forgotten the day of the week. The following conversation ensues. Darryl: What's the day? I don't think it is Thursday, Friday or Saturday. Tracy: Well that doesn't narrow it down much. Yesterday was Sunday. Melissa: Yesterday wasn't Sunday, tomorrow is Sunday. Ben: The day after tomorrow is Saturday. Adrienne: The day before yesterday was Thursday. Susie: Tomorrow is Saturday. David: I know that the day after tomorrow is not Friday. If only one person's statement is true, what day of the week is it? Enjoy!
 
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Riddle: What has many keys but unlocks no doors? No cheating (Googling)!
 
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My Fren tested me this riddle and i still couldn't solve , so need help Question : When a person dies, he will be walking along a path. At the end of the path, it splits up into two different ways. One way is to Heaven and One way is to Hell. An Angel which will only tell the truth is guarding the Hell's Gate. A Devil which will only tell lies is guarding the Heaven's Gate. They both looked the same so by looking at them, you will not know who is the Angel and who is the Devil. Without knowing anything about himself, not even knowing that he had died. He can only ask ONE question to determine which way is to Heaven. What will the question be? hint : questions like "am i dead?" "are u angel?" won't work. think hard enough. this is a IQ question and the answer is logical. EDITED : That person knows that the Angel is guarding the Hell and the Devil is guarding the Heaven. He also knows that Angel will be telling the truth and Devil will be telling lies. He does not know anything else. Please post ur ans thank you.(especially if you knew it)
 
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45) PNEUMONO­ULTRA­MICRO­SCOPIC­SILICO­VOLCANO­CONIOSIS (also spelled PNEUMONO­ULTRA­MICRO­SCOPIC­SILICO­VOLCANO­KONIOSIS) = a lung disease caused by breathing in particles of siliceous volcanic dust. This is the longest word in any English dictionary. However, it was coined by Everett Smith, the President of The National Puzzlers' League, in 1935 purely for the purpose of inventing a new "longest word". The Oxford English Dictionary described the word as factitious. Nevertheless it also appears in the Webster's, Random House, and Chambers dictionaries. (37) HEPATICO­CHOLANGIO­CHOLECYST­ENTERO­STOMIES = a surgical creation of a connection between the gall bladder and a hepatic duct and between the intestine and the gall bladder. This is the longest word in Gould's Medical Dictionary. (34) SUPER­CALI­FRAGI­LISTIC­EXPI­ALI­DOCIOUS = song title from the Walt Disney movie Mary Poppins. It is in the Oxford English Dictionary. "But then one day I learned a word That saved me achin' nose, The biggest word you ever 'eard, And this is 'ow it goes: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!" (30) HIPPOPOTO­MONSTRO­SESQUIPED­AL­IAN = pertaining to a very long word. From Mrs. Byrne's Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure and Preposterous Words. (29) FLOCCI­NAUCINI­HILIPIL­IFICATION = an estimation of something as worthless. This is the longest word in the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary. Interestingly the most common letter in English, E, does not appear in this word at all, whilst I occurs a total of nine times. The word dates back to 1741. The 1992 Guinness Book of World Records calls flocci­nauci­nihili­pilification the longest real word in the Oxford English Dictionary, and refers to pneumono­ultra­micro­scopic­silico­volcano­koniosis as the longest made-up one. (28) ANTI­DIS­ESTABLISH­MENT­ARIAN­ISM = the belief which opposes removing the tie between church and state. Probably the most popular of the "longest words" in recent decades. (27) HONORI­FICABILI­TUDINI­TATIBUS = honorableness. The word first appeared in English in 1599, and in 1721 was listed by Bailey's Dictionary as the longest word in English. It was used by Shakespeare in Love's Labor's Lost (Costard; Act V, Scene I): "O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words. I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word; for thou art not so long by the head as honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier swallowed than a flap-dragon." Shakespeare does not use any other words over 17 letters in length. (27) ELECTRO­ENCEPHALO­GRAPHICALLY The longest unhyphenated word in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (10th Ed.), joint with ethylene­diamine­tetraacetate (see below). (27) ANTI­TRANSUB­STAN­TIA­TION­ALIST = one who doubts that consecrated bread and wine actually change into the body and blood of Christ. (21) DIS­PRO­PORTION­ABLE­NESS and (21) IN­COM­PREHEN­SIB­ILITIES These are described by the 1992 Guinness Book of World Records as the longest words in common usage. Some say SMILES is the longest word because there is a MILE between the first and last letters! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Chemical Terms Two chemical terms (3,641 and 1,913 letters long) have appeared in the Guinness Book of World Records. They were withdrawn because they have never been used by chemists, and there is no theoretical limit to the length of possible legitimate chemical terms. A DNA molecule could have a name of over 1,000,000,000 letters if it was written out in full. (1,185) ACETYL­SERYL­TYROSYL­SERYL­ISO­LEUCYL­THREONYL­SERYL­PROLYL­SERYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­VALYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­LEUCYL­SERYL­SERYL­VALYL­TRYPTOPHYL­ALANYL­ASPARTYL­PROLYL­ISOLEUCYL­GLUTAMYL­LEUCYL­LEUCYL­ASPARAGINYL­VALYL­CYSTEINYL­THREONYL­SERYL­SERYL­LEUCYL­GLYCYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­GLUTAMINYL­THREONYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­ALANYL­ARGINYL­THREONYL­THREONYL­GLUTAMINYL­VALYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­SERYL­GLUTAMINYL­VALYL­TRYPTOPHYL­LYSYL­PROLYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­PROLYL­GLUTAMINYL­SERYL­THREONYL­VALYL­ARGINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­PROLYL­GLYCYL­ASPARTYL­VALYL­TYROSYL­LYSYL­VALYL­TYROSYL­ARGINYL­TYROSYL­ASPARAGINYL­ALANYL­VALYL­LEUCYL­ASPARTYL­PROLYL­LEUCYL­ISOLEUCYL­THREONYL­ALANYL­LEUCYL­LEUCYL­GLYCYL­THREONYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­ASPARTYL­THREONYL­ARGINYL­ASPARAGINYL­ARGINYL­ISOLEUCYL­ISOLEUCYL­GLUTAMYL­VALYL­GLUTAMYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­SERYL­PROLYL­THREONYL­THREONYL­ALANYL­GLUTAMYL­THREONYL­LEUCYL­ASPARTYL­ALANYL­THREONYL­ARGINYL­ARGINYL­VALYL­ASPARTYL­ASPARTYL­ALANYL­THREONYL­VALYL­ALANYL­ISOLEUCYL­ARGINYL­SERYL­ALANYL­ASPARAGINYL­ISOLEUCYL­ASPARAGINYL­LEUCYL­VALYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMYL­LEUCYL­VALYL­ARGINYL­GLYCYL­THREONYL­GLYCYL­LEUCYL­TYROSYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMINYL­ASPARAGINYL­THREONYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­GLUTAMYL­SERYL­METHIONYL­SERYL­GLYCYL­LEUCYL­VALYL­TRYPTOPHYL­THREONYL­SERYL­ALANYL­PROLYL­ALANYL­SERINE = Tobacco Mosaic Virus, Dahlemense Strain. This word has appeared in the American Chemical Society's Chemical Abstracts and is thus considered by some to be the longest real word. (39) TETRA­METHYL­DIAMINO­BENZHYDRYL­PHOSPHINOUS = a type of acid. This is the longest chemical term in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd Ed.). It does not have its own entry but appears under a citation for another word. (37) FORMALDEHYDE­TETRA­METHYL­AMIDO­FLUORIMUM Chemical term in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd Ed.). (37) DIMETHYL­AMIDO­PHENYL­DIMETHYL­PYRAZOLONE Chemical term in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd Ed.). (31) DICHLORO­DIPHENYL­TRICHLORO­ETHANE = a pesticide used to kill lice; abbrv. DDT. It is the longest word in the Macquarie Dictionary and is also in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd Ed.). (29) TRINITRO­PHENYL­METHYL­NITRAMINE = a type of explosive. This is the longest chemical term in Webster's Dictionary (3rd Ed.). (27) ETHYLENE­DIAMINE­TETRA­ACETATE The longest unhyphenated word in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (10th Ed.), joint with electroencephalographically (see above). (26) ETHYLENE­DIAMINE­TETRA­ACETIC = a type of acid; abbrv. EDTA. This word appears in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (10th Ed.). -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Place Names There are many long place names around the world. Here are a few of the largest. (85) TAUMATA­WHAKA­TANGI­HANGA­KOAUAU­O­TAMATEA­TURIPUKAKA­PIKI­MAUNGA­HORO­NUKU­POKAI­WHENUA­KITANA­TAHU A hill in New Zealand. This Maori name was in general use, but is now generally abbreviated to Taumata. The name means: the summit of the hill, where Tamatea, who is known as the land eater, slid down, climbed up and swallowed mountains, played on his nose flute to his loved one. (66) GORSA­FAWDDACH­AIDRAIGODAN­HEDDO­GLEDDOLON­PENRHYN­AREUR­DRAETH­CEREDIGION A town in Wales. The name means: the Mawddach station and its dragon teeth at the Northern Penrhyn Road on the golden beach of Cardigan bay. (58) LLAN­FAIR­PWLL­GWYN­GYLL­GOGERY­CHWYRN­DROBWLL­LLANTY­SILIO­GOGO­GOCH A town in North Wales. The name roughly translates as: St. Mary's Church in the hollow of the white hazel near to the rapid whirlpool of Llantysilio of the red cave. It is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records. (41) CHAR­GOGAGOG­MAN­CHAR­GOGAGOG­CHAR­BUNA­GUNGAMOG Another name for Lake Webster in Massachusetts. Probably the longest name in the United States. Alternative spellings are: (44) CHAR­GOGGAGOGG­MAN­CHAUG­GAGOGG­CHAU­BUNA­GUNGAMOGG, (45) CHAR­GOGGAGOGG­MAN­CHAUG­GAGOGG­CHAU­BUNA­GUNGAMAUGG, (44) CHAR­GOGGAGOGG­MAN­CHAUG­GAGOGG­CHA­BUNA­GUNGAMAUGG. (23) NUNATH­LOOGAGA­MIUT­BINGOI The Eskimo name for some dunes in Alaska, according to The Book of Names by J. N. Hook.
 
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