Please look at this question.

"The categories of business expenses for which employees are supposed to be reimbursed are ___ to be discussed with the CEO
(1) yet (2) beyond (3) rarely (4) permanently

The correct answer is "(1) yet". I also think it is the best answer. By the way, can't I put rarely there?
[1]
"Business expenses are rarely to be discussed with the CEO"

Is this sentence perfectly wrong in grammar?

I think the best answer is (1) yet in the context but for "rarely" I can put there. Am I wrong?

On the other hand,
[2]
"Business expenses are rarely to be discussed with the CEO" = "Business expenses are seldom to be discussed with the CEO" (Correct?)

Thank you for your answers in advance.
Contributing Member1,173
Son JamesBy the way, can't I put "rarely" there?
No, the sentence would not make much sense. Yet does not mean rarely. The sentence is supposed to mean that the discussion has not taken place but is expected to in the future.

In the right context, you could say Business expenses are [rarely / seldom] discussed with the CEO. Rarely and seldom are synonyms.

(4000 posts already? Emotion: surprise)
Veteran Member7,975
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Thank you so much for your answer,Mr.Aspara GusEmotion: embarrassed . You've made me know it clear. Thanks once again.
I'd say that your original assessment is correct. "Rarely" could be used in this case, but does not feel as correct as "yet".

I don't agree with Aspara Gus that the sentence is clearly supposed to mean that the discussion has not taken place but is expected to in the future, although it is implied. If the author wanted "rarely" to be the right answer, I believe the sentence would have been written differently.
New Member21
Psychoword"Rarely" could be used in this case
The categories of business expenses for which employees are supposed to be reimbursed are rarely to be discussed with the CEO.

This does not sound like good English to me.
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Thank you for your answer. I also agree that the best answer is "yet". I just want to know whether or not I can use "rarely" or "seldom" there. Thanks once again,Mr.PsychowordEmotion: embarrassed
Thank you for your answers,Mr.Aspara Gus. Thanks to this answer of yours, I could learn so many things,Emotion: embarrassed
After thinking about this further, I realized that "are rarely to be discussed" isn't really proper, although I have heard phrases such as this one in the past.

If "rarely" was the correct answer, the sentence should have read:

The categories of business expenses for which employees are supposed to be reimbursed are ______ discussed with the CEO.
As Mr.Aspara Gus said, If I want to use "rarely" there, I need to omit "to be". Because "to be" indicates tense of "future". It should be more natural. Thank you for your answer,Mr.PsychowordEmotion: embarrassed
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