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Sentence: "You need to worry chum, the future of the Centrist is not safe in the hands of her"

My question: Is the article "the" needed before the word Centrist? I wasn't sure so I tried Google, but it confused me further. For e.g. if you Google "the future of Right" and "the future of the Right", you will find the people, like columnists, book authors etc., who supposedly have command-over-English-language using the word Right with and without the article "the". I searched this just to clear my doubt. Google links: http://to.ly/5Tzj , http://to.ly/5Tzf . My feelings is that article "the" should come there. But I will use it only after your advice. So please help me.

Thanks and regards Emotion: smile
Full Member432
I'll try.

The future of the right/ centrist requires the article because it refers to a single person (even though many are implied). It is dropped when pluralized.

The future of the American family is strengthened by a good economy.

The future of American families is strengh.......

I'm hoping for better enlightenment from my colleagues.
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Oh! I see. I didn't know this thing before. Learned a news thing today. Thanks, sireEmotion: smile. And yes, I'll also welcome more enlightenment on this issue. Just one more question are all articles, like a, an, the, are dropped before a pluralized term? Is there no exception? Asking so that I have no confusion in the future.

Regards
RazerSentence: "You need to worry chum, the future of the Centrist is not safe in the hands of her"

My question: Is the article "the" needed before the word Centrist?
Assuming that Centrist is the name of a political party, you need the.

Personally, I would pluralize. In the plural you can use the or leave it out.

A few additional observations:
You have a run-on sentence. Make it two sentences.
"the hands of her" is not idiomatic English. You need "her hands".

You need to worry, chum. The future of (the) Centrists is not safe in her hands.

CJ
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Razerare all articles, like a, an, the, are dropped before a pluralized term?
No. Articles are not always dropped before a plural noun, although, obviously, a and an are not appropriate with plurals. Therefore, with plurals you have only the choice of using the or not using the.

CJ
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No, by Centrist I'm not referring to any party. I was referring to Centrist ideology. Thanks for clearing this "in the plural you can use the or leave it out".

Apropos of the idiom "her hands" I would like to say have you read something like this in the newspaper "Nuclear bomb are not safe in the hands of terrorist or redical regimes"?

Regards
CalifJim No. Articles are not always dropped before a plural noun, although, obviously, a and an are not appropriate with plurals. Therefore, with plurals you have only the choice of using the or not using the.
Many thanks for clearing this doubt Emotion: smile
Razer"You need to worry chum, the future of the Centrist is not safe in the hands of her"
RazerApropos of the idiom "her hands" I would like to say have you read something like this in the newspaper "Nuclear bombs are not safe in the hands of terrorists or radical regimes"?
CJ is right, and you are right too. How can this be?

The expression is formed: "hands of the X," if X, the object of the preposition, is a noun. In the case of pronouns, we use the inflected possessive form, not the prepositional phrase "of ..."

For instance:

That is her car. That is my book. This is their problem. Yes.

That is the car of her. That is the book of me. This is the problem of them. No.
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AlpheccaStarsThe expression is formed: "hands of the X," if X, the object of the preposition, is a noun. In the case of pronouns, we use the inflected possessive form, not the prepositional phrase "of ..."
Thanks Alpha. Got everything you told. But feel it would be more easy for me to undersand if your above qouted qoute was in more lucid words.Emotion: smile
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