Hello, everyone.

What is a differece between 'resign' and 'resign from'? Is there a rule about them?

Many thanks in advance.
Full Member171
Anonymous:
To resign is to willingly leave a job.

Resign form? I beleive you meant a resignation form; which would be a form that one fills in order to sumit their resignation. However, the term usually used is a resignation letter.
screamererTo resign is to willingly leave a job.Resign form? I beleive you meant a resignation form; which would be a form that one fills in order to sumit their resignation. However, the term usually used is a resignation letter.
No, youngbuts meant 'resign from', I think. It was a typo.
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Anonymous:
fivejedjonNo, youngbuts meant 'resign from', I think. It was a typo.
Oops! Sorry, my bad.
Emotion: tongue tied
No, It is my fault. I should have posted with some example sentences wihich I could get from dictionaries or the internet. I thoght without them it could save your time. Here some sentences I got from some dictionaries.

resign+object
▪ The senator was forced to resign his position.
▪ My father resigned his directorship last year.

resign from
▪ She resigned from the government last week.
▪ Two members resigned from the board in protest.
▪ He resigned from his job as principal of the school.

My mother language does't have any similar grammatical signal to prepostions and articles. We usually put any grammatical signal after head words, so aticles and prepositions, which are put before noun phrases, make it difficult for me to understand English. Anyway, What is a difference between "resign" and "resign from"? Accoding to what you told me, I guess "resign from" could imply unwillingly quit a job or a position while "resign" imply a spontaneity. Am I right? Or both phrases have not much difference that I need to be concerned for. Or at this times is "resign from" used not much? Dictionaries put together them in one caregory of meaning, which I guess means the distiguition is difficult to explain with a logical word. However I would like know it.

Many thanks to fivejedjon and screamerer
It's a matter of usage, not meaning. I guess we resign a post but resign from a group or a job.
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Thank you for your comment, enoon.

Still I'm a little bit confusedl. That's because I don't understand the English concept of "a post" in English. To me English nouns are difficult to understand as they change their meaning with or without the "article". Which of the following sentences do you think is more natrural?

(1) He resigned the post of Mayor.
(2) He resigned from the post of Mayor.

Is it better that I consider "the post of Mayor" belongs to a kind of job?

Many thanks in advance
youngbutsThank you for your comment, enoon.Still I'm a little bit confusedl. That's because I don't understand the English concept of "a post" in English. To me English nouns are difficult to understand as they change their meaning with or without the "article". Which of the following sentences do you think is more natrural?(1) He resigned the post of Mayor.(2) He resigned from the post of Mayor.Is it better that I consider "the post of Mayor" belongs to a kind of job?Many thanks in advance
When you actually put "post of" in there, it becomes the other thing, oddly. He resigned from the post of mayor, but he resigned the mayoralty. Let's try "office": "He resigned the office of president." Nope, I don't like it. He resigned from the office of president, but he resigned his office, and he resigned the presidency.

I'm neither following any rule here nor making any up. I am reporting what sounds idiomatic to me. I can only hope that my observations are of some use to you.
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Your advice is a lot, a lot and a lot helpful. I'm sorry that I don't know an approprate expression in English for my appreciation to you.
I don't say my mother language according to any rule either. I don't think any human on the earth analyzes oxygen to take a breath. Just when a Martain would stay on this planet, he or she need to find a rule, because their body is already adjusted to the other like me. However, I think I have gotten closer to an oxygen of English thanks to you.

many thanks again. enoon.
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