Romeo's Soliloquy

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1 2
One more part I really like...

Romeo.
But soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!--

Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou her maid art far more fair than she:
Be not her maid, since she is envious;
Her vestal livery is but sick and green,
And none but fools do wear it; cast it off.--
It is my lady; O, it is my love!
O, that she knew she were!--
She speaks, yet she says nothing: what of that?
Her eye discourses, I will answer it.--
I am too bold, 'tis not to me she speaks:
Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,
Having some business, do entreat her eyes
To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
What if her eyes were there, they in her head?
The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars,
As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven
Would through the airy region stream so bright
That birds would sing and think it were not night.--
See how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
O that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!
Senior Member3,347
YoHfO that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!

I love those lines...[F]
Contributing Member1,324
YoHfSee how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
O that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!

These are my favourites.

[Y]
Jac, I can't remember where I read it, but I think it might be in Romeo and Juliet. The poet wishes he were a tear in the eye of the one he loved, that he may fall on her cheek. Can you place it?

And try this one from William Wordsworth, I think it's beautiful.

She dwelt among the untrodden ways

She dwelt among the untrodden ways
Beside the springs of Dove,
A Maid whom there were none to praise
And very few to love:

A violet by a mossy stone
Half hidden from the eye!
--Fair as a star, when only one
Is shining in the sky.

She lived unknown, and few could know
When Lucy ceased to be;
But she is in her grave, and, oh,
The difference to me!
TearsofjoyJac, I can't remember where I read it, but I think it might be in Romeo and Juliet. The poet wishes he were a tear in the eye of the one he loved, that he may fall on her cheek. Can you place it?

Mmm. I haven't heard that very one, but I can ask my teacher. Lovely poem anyway.

[Y]
Anonymous:
Does anyone know the words engraved on the ring given to Juliet by Romeo
YoHf
One more part I really like...

Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou her maid art far more fair than she:
Be not her maid, since she is envious;
Her vestal livery is but sick and green,
And none but fools do wear it; cast it off.--

I like those lines.

Is Juliet a virgin through out the play? If she were, she would be a fool as if what Romeo had said.

Thanks

Full Member414
Anonymous:
In reply to this i have my view as to what Rmeo was thinking (being a man I can see where he's coming from)

he seems to be implying that Juliet (being a virgin) should throw off the clothes of maidenhood and essentially have sex with him.

he is saying something to the effect of "Virginity really is NOT as good as you think Juliet so really give it up. It is foolish to stay this way so give it up."
Anonymous:
oh Shakespeare....

now THAT is a man who knows how to conquer the English language perfectly. He knows how to look at a situation, analyze it, depict the personality of those who are about to read his writing, and those who possibly could have written what he is about to write. He makes a guess at what a normal person would write and than surpasses it beautifully. he also looks into the mind of the readers and wonders, what they want to hear, what will get to them, what will make them cry, and creates it.
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