Safe VS safely?

17 replies
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Hi,

How about this one...

get home safe VS get home safely.

Do natives feel any difference on these two expressions?

How about this logic?

"He's got home safe" means that "He's arrived home and he is safe".

And, "He's got home safely" means that "He arrived home in a safe manner, but later it turns out that he was wounded"

Simply absurd?
Contributing Member1,186
pructusHow about this logic?

"He's got home safe" means that "He's arrived home and he is safe".

And, "He's got home safely" means that "He arrived home in a safe manner, but later it turns out that he was wounded"
I call that "digging too deep". Emotion: smile

I don't believe native speakers think about these things in this way. There is no difference in meaning. 'safely' is just a higher-register version of 'safe' in this sentence.

CJ
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A common expression is:
He arrived home safe and sound.

That assures us that he was in no way harmed during the journey.
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Thanks to you, all !!

I have an undying question in English.

Natives say, "Take it easy", "Think different", "Talk tough", and "He arrived home safe and sound", etc.

I've been wondering if they really feel them to be the same with "Take it easily", "Think differently", "Talk toughly", and "He arrived home safely and soundly".

This part may be nothing particular of interest to native speakers, but, for example, in Steve Jobs's Biography, "Think different" was mis-translated, by one of the biggest publishers in Korea, into "Think something different".

I see that this part would not be so much of some academic area, as of "what the native speakers think".
How about this one?

Bauer's on sight. Whoever's near the guest house, we're going in strong. (24, 112)

*** *** *** ***
Isn't "We're going in strongly" different from "We're going in strong"?

To my non-native sense, "go in strong" seems to mean "go in armed with guns" and "go in strongly" seems to mean, "go in, putting down some resistance".
pructusHow about this one...get home safe VS get home safely.Do natives feel any difference on these two expressions?How about this logic?"He's got home safe" means that "He's arrived home and he is safe".And, "He's got home safely" means that "He arrived home in a safe manner, but later it turns out that he was wounded"Simply absurd.
No, not absurd: your logic is well-founded.

In "He got home safe", "safe" is an optional predicative complement referring to "He". It has a depictive meaning: we understand that he was unharmed at the time of his arrival home. Optional predicatives like this are quite common:

"They departed content". "Kim got home tired". "He arrived home safe and sound". (your second-post example)

"Content", "tired", "safe" and "sound" are not modifying "departed", "got" and "arrived"; they are predicatives with "Ed", "Kim", and "He" as predicands.

Optional predicatives like this can also occur with transitive verbs:

"They served the coffee blindfolded".

BillJ
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Thanks so much, BillJ !!

How about "think different"?

I'd like to know what you think about "think different"....
Anonymous:
Hello, Pructus:

I think that I have the answer from the horse's mouth (i.e., Steve Jobs himself).

"But Jobs insisted that he wanted 'different' to be used as a noun, as in 'think victory' or 'think beauty.' Also it echoed
colloquial use, as in 'think big.' "

Mr. Jobs was quoted as saying: " 'Think differently' wouldn't hit the meaning for me."

Source: The New Yorker magazine, November 14, 2011, page 34.
Second that. It's iconic.

(Although "Think big" can be intended as noun or adjective, depending on context. Casual, of course.)

Think of it as a big thing. vs Think in grand terms.
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