Saloon Vs. Salon

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R. Rajesh Jeba Anbiah:
My first language is Tamil. I had some problems when I contributed to the "Indian English" topic at
.
In India, most of the people use the word "Saloon" to refer to the "barbershop". So, my understanding is that it is misspelt for "Salon". The dictionaries that I looked up agrees with me (attached below the result). But, someone there who has exposure to Western culture says it is also misspelt in Euro-American culture and so it is not an Indian err which is hard for me to agree. Could someone please help? If you answer, please tell me about your English (AmE or BrE...). TIA

>8
Dictionary results:
Saloon: http://www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn2.0?stage=1&word=saloon
1. barroom, bar, saloon, ginmill, taproom (a room or establishmentwhere alcoholic drinks are served over a counter; "he drowned his sorrows in whiskey at the bar")

2. public house, pub, saloon, pothouse, gin mill, taphouse (tavernconsisting of a building with a bar and public rooms; often provides light meals)
Salon: http://www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn2.0?stage=1&word=salon
1. salon (gallery where works of art can be displayed)
2. salon, beauty salon, beauty parlor, beauty parlour, beauty shop (a shop where hairdressers and beauticians work)

3. salon (elegant sitting room where guests are received) 8<

"Believe it or not, patriotism is one of the worst dividing forces" Email: rrjanbiah-at-Y!com
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Donna Richoux:
"
My first language is Tamil. I had some problems when I contributed to the "Indian English" topic at . ... shop (a shop where hairdressers and beauticians work) 3. salon (elegant sitting room where guests are received) 8
Does that answer your question?

Best wishes Donna Richoux
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Stewart Gordon:
[nq:1]d chiefly British : SALON 4 2 : SALON 2[/nq]
Strange - here in Britain, the only common meaning of "saloon" is a style of car (US: "sedan"). Though we do have "saloon bar", the posh bit of a pub, though I'm not sure how many pubs actually have such a thing these days.
Maybe "saloon" and "salon" were synonyms once upon a time. But long before mine.
Stewart.

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Jess Askin:
[nq:1][/nq]
[nq:2]d chiefly British : SALON 4 2 : SALON 2[/nq]
[nq:1] Strange - here in Britain, the only common meaning of "saloon" is a style of car (US: "sedan"). Though ... have such a thing these days. Maybe "saloon" and "salon" were synonyms once upon a time. But long before mine.[/nq]
And today "saloon" is virtually extinct in AmE, except as a jocular description of a bar or tavern of yesteryear, as in a Western.
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Skitt:
[nq:2] Strange - here in Britain, the only common ... were synonyms once upon a time. But long before mine.[/nq]
[nq:1]And today "saloon" is virtually extinct in AmE, except as a jocular description of a bar or tavern of yesteryear, as in a Western.[/nq]
Or as a name for a watering hole in some Western towns (Livermore Saloon, for instance a place where I have spent a considerable amount of hours).
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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Jess Askin:
[nq:2]And today "saloon" is virtually extinct in AmE, except as a jocular description of a bar or tavern of yesteryear, as in a Western.[/nq]
[nq:1]Or as a name for a watering hole in some Western towns (Livermore Saloon, for instance a place where I have spent a considerable amount ofhours).[/nq]
As in, "never will I see my liver more?"
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Steve Hayes:
[nq:2] Strange - here in Britain, the only common ... were synonyms once upon a time. But long before mine.[/nq]
[nq:1]And today "saloon" is virtually extinct in AmE, except as a jocular description of a bar or tavern of yesteryear, as in a Western.[/nq]
South African trains of yesteryear had dining saloons, but I think privatisation put paid to that.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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./Rob &:
[nq:2] Strange - here in Britain, the only common ... were synonyms once upon a time. But long before mine.[/nq]
[nq:1]And today "saloon" is virtually extinct in AmE, except as a jocular description of a bar or tavern of yesteryear, as in a Western.[/nq]
Agreed. When I hear "saloon" I think of a place where duel proposals are made; a bar in the "Wild West."
Also, if you lived in the 1800's, you had the greatest chance of being called a "yella belly" in a saloon.(1)
(1) According to great historians like John Wayne and Michael J. Fox.
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Bob Cunningham:
[nq:2]And today "saloon" is virtually extinct in AmE, except as a jocular description of a bar or tavern of yesteryear, as in a Western.[/nq]
It may be a little-known fact that on ships of the US merchant marine the saloon is the dining area for the ship's officers. Anyway, it was still invariably called that as late as 1946 when I was last aboard a merchant ship.

That meaning is said to come from another language (probably Dutch), where "saloon" referred to an elite establishment. The same rumor goes on to say that the use of "saloon" for an ordinary joint in which to consume alcoholic beverages arose from early entrepreneurs calling their places saloons, with the original meaning in mind, to make them sound high class.
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